Grilling Up a Patriotic and Cancer Preventive Plate

On this fourth of July, treat your family and friends to a healthy, delicious and cancer-protective backyard barbecue featuring a patriotic red, white and blue menu.

Brightly colored seasonal and familiar favorites like watermelon and blueberries are always welcome, but it’s also a great time to introduce new food ideas that fit on AICR’s New American Plate – a plant-focused way of eating for cancer prevention.20286510_m

1. Grilling in White: Fish is tasty done on the grill – whether you go with steaks, fillets (try a wire grill basket) or whole fish, marinating ahead of time keeps it moist, flavorful and may help reduce formation of certain carcinogenic compounds that form on animal protein with high heat and charring. Try our Tilapia with Warm Tomato Salsa or Moroccan Grilled Fish with Charmoula. Continue reading


Globally, Sugary Beverages May Lead to 184,000 Deaths from Cancer, Other Diseases

Sugary sodas and other drinks lead to an estimated 184,000 deaths around the world each year, including over 6,000 from cancers alone, suggests a new analysis that quantified the effects of these drinks for the three leading causes of death.SodaGlass_canstockphoto2131264

While many health organizations — including AICR — recommend avoiding sugary drinks, this analysis highlights the powerful effect that cutting out one single part of the diet may have, independent of other healthy changes.

For cancer, AICR research has found that sugary drinks lead to weight gain and being overweight, which is linked to increased risk of ten cancers.

In this analysis, sugar sweetened beverages was defined as any beverage that contained at least 50 calories per serving. This included sugar-sweetened sodas, fruit drinks, sports/energy drinks, and homemade drinks: 100 percent fruit juice was excluded. Continue reading


Study: Eating Nuts for Lower Cancer Risk

Nuts are in fashion, nutritionally speaking, especially for heart health. Now, a new study finds that if you eat a handful of nuts several times a week that may help lower your risk of cancer.

Study results on nut consumption and cancer prevention have been inconsistent. In this systematic review and meta-analysis published in Nutrition Reviews, the researchers evaluated 36 studies – both large population studies and clinical trials – examining the relationship between eating nuts and risk of cancer or type 2 diabetes.

By comparing people who ate the most nuts (typically at least 4-5 times per week) to those who ate the least (typically 1 time per week or less), the researchers found that the high nut eaters had 15 percent lower risk of cancer overall. In specific cancers, they found lower risk for colorectal, endometrial and pancreatic cancer. They did not find any significant difference for risk of type 2 diabetes. Continue reading