Study: Eating High Amounts of Fats May Increase Risk of Certain Breast Tumors

For both pre- and postmenopausal breast cancers, the many studies looking on whether dietary fat matters has resulted in no clear conclusions. Now comes a study from Italy suggesting that it does for certain types of breast tumors, including the most common type.Fat, Fat and Fat

The study suggests that consuming high amounts of total fat, and saturated fats specifically, links to increased risk of breast tumors fueled by the hormones estrogen and progesterone. About three quarters of US breast tumors are estrogen-receptor positive (ER+). The majority of those also grow in response to progesterone.

The increased risk was most pronounced for high amounts of saturated fat, the type of fat from burgers, butter and primarily animal sources.

Here’s the study abstract, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

This is one study, and it will be added to the body of evidence on breast cancer prevention in AICR/WCRF’s Continuous Update Project (CUP). In the latest CUP report, there was not enough evidence on total dietary fat to make a conclusion for pre- or postmenopausal cancers. Continue reading


New Analysis: High-fat to Low Helps with Weight Loss

Whether the amount of fat we eat affects our weight has been a hot topic of debate for years. Now, an analysis of the research finds that fat matters, and just switching higher-fat foods for their lower-fat counterparts – without any other dietary change – can help dieters lose a modest but significant amount of weight.

The study was published online in BMJ.

For the analysis, researchers looked at the 43 studies that compared a group of people who ate a low-fat diet to those eating the usual amount of fat. Thirty-three of those studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), lasting from six months over eight years and including almost 75,000 people.

RCTs are considered one of the strongest types of studies, randomly giving one group the dietary intervention and then tracking all involved. Continue reading