Trends in Cancer Prevention Research

Like last year, I created a Google Spreadsheet to query raw publication counts from PubMed of food/nutrition/health terms from an AICR/WCRF report. This is a way to visualize how nutrition and cancer research may be changing over time. The counts represent the number of published articles containing the term in column A plus “cancer” in the title or abstract.

Like last year, I used the following color scheme from the AICR report: the coloring reflects the strongest confidence for an association between the term and a decreased or increased risk for at least one cancer type. Terms with a yellow background were not in the document list and added by me.

The spreadsheet is sorted by column D: the percentage of papers published in 2013 compared to 2012. This will still change as PubMed will be indexing papers published in 2013 for some time, but the spreadsheet auto-updates daily so it will become more accurate over time. Column M shows the average publication count change per year over the last 6 years (2008 to 2013), which may better reflect the recent trend. Continue reading


Top Diet Rankings (Cancer Prevention Missing)

NAP-Plate-v02Healthy — and not so healthy — diets are in the news today, with US News releasing their best-diet rankings.

Among the 32 diets evaluated, the DASH diet ranked best overall. It also tied for top spot in diabetes control. With it’s full name — Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension — you can probably tell that it was originally developed to control blood pressure. Paleo diet ranked at the bottom.

US News experts focused on eight categories, including the best diet for weight loss, diabetes, and heart-health. But they did not focus on the best diet for cancer prevention. (Maybe next year!) Continue reading


Report: Half of Cancer Deaths are Preventable

Almost one of every two people born today will develop cancer, but more than half of all cancer deaths are preventable, according to a major report released today on the state of cancer progress.AICR_trefoil

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) report estimates that 580,350 Americans will die from cancer this year. More than half of these cancer deaths link to preventable causes, including smoking, obesity, poor diet, drinking alcohol, inactivity, and sun exposure.

This report’s section on preventability aligns with AICR findings that lifestyle matters when it comes to lowering cancer risk.

Decades of funding and analyzing the research on diet, body fat, and physical activity have led to some clear conclusions on cancer prevention and survivorship. AICR estimates that staying a healthy weight, eating a healthy diet, and daily activity can prevent over a third of US cancer cases. Continue reading