Study: Stroll to Prevent Diabetes (and Possibly Cancer)

Evidence is clear that doing at least 150 minutes weekly of moderate physical activity lowers risk for type 2-diabetes. Now, one study shows that even light physical activity may provide some benefit for people at highest risk.bigstock-Mature-Couple-Walking-37462687

Type 2-diabetes increases risk for several cancers, including those of the liver, colon and endometrium. Both diseases share many risk factors, including insulin resistance.

The study, published in the International Journal of Obesity, included 68 sedentary, overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes. They were randomly assigned to two groups. Both groups attended two educational sessions at the beginning of the 3 month study, but only one group attended a supervised walking program – 60 minutes, 3 times per week. Continue reading


Cooking for the Family… Gluten-free, Vegan and All

dreamstime_xs_32728722From vegetarian to vegan, diabetic to gluten-free, is your family’s table one of the many Thanksgiving spreads looking to please special diet restrictions?

These diet restrictions mean you have to make changes to traditional recipes and this may present a lot of “hangups” for both the rookie holiday host and the tenured chef of the family. We can lend a helping hand.

Makeover #1: Stuffing, Gluten free

This staple is usually made with bread, which contains a protein called gluten.  People with celiac disease must avoid gluten completely; others may be sensitive to gluten and experience intestinal discomfort. Here are a few suggestions for your gluten-free diners:

Makeover #2: Macaroni and cheese, healthier version

Please vegetarians or non-turkey lovers with a creamy, delicious and healthy mac and cheese dish.

  • For an easy change to a crowd favorite, swap out the regular macaroni noodles for whole-wheat or whole-grain noodles to give your mac and cheese a fiber boost
  • Also, check out AICR’s recipe for Pumpkin Mac & Cheese. Adding pumpkin keeps the familiar creaminess without overloading on cheese
  • If you’re not into pumpkin, try a macaroni and cheese made with a cauliflower cheese sauce. You’ll get your fix of cruciferous veggies, while still enjoying a holiday favorite Continue reading


Fruit Flies, Sugar and Your Cancer Risk

Sugar and cancer: it’s a hot topic these days and this week it made headlines again. A new study in fruit flies suggests that a high-sugar diet may explain why people with type 2 diabetes and obesity are at a higher risk for cancer.canstockphoto6419328

The study was published in Cell and here is the abstract. Basically, the study found that when fruit flies consumed a high-sugar diet it changes the signaling pathways of two human genes that can cause cancer called oncogenes, Ras and Src. That, in turn, caused tumor progression and metastasis.

Articles on the study have honed in on the dangers of a high-sugar diet for cancer risk, so we spoke with our nutrition advisor Karen Collins, a registered dietitian and expert on diabetes and cancer risk. Here, Karen talks about the study and says that when it comes to eating for lower cancer risk and good health, it’s not all about the sugar.

Q: This study focuses on metabolic disorders seen in type 2 diabetes and some cancers. Why is this important?
A: The research shows that people with type 2 diabetes and obesity are at increased risk of developing several cancers, such as postmenopausal breast and pancreatic. A metabolic environment in the body with inflammation and high levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factors is common to both type 2 diabetes and several types of cancer, and seems to be part of what promotes their development. Continue reading