Five Ways to Use Leftover Halloween Candy that Could Even Be Healthy


10762288_sNow that Halloween has come and gone, it’s time for the annual question: what to do with the leftover treats your kids have racked up? Here are a few creative ways to use that candy, from quick snacks to science projects, that are both fun and educational.

1. Cereal and Nut Mix
This can be a delicious and healthful snack to make with kids. Use a mix of whole-wheat cereal, nuts – and this year – some of your Halloween candy. Whether you enjoy candy corn or crispy chocolate bars, adding small amounts make a creative addition to the whole-grain cereal and nut mixture. This would be a great snack for Thanksgiving dinner—you’re going to need something to hold you over while the turkey is baking!

2. Piñata
Do you have an upcoming party that will feature a piñata? Save that Halloween candy! No need to buy more when you have leftovers. Use it to fill the piñata and enjoy! Continue reading

High-School SuperFoods Winner, trying new foods and fusion


It’s that time of year, again. The dishes are in and the judges have made their decision; first place goes to… New York City’s Kristopher Lopez, whose execution of Faux –lafels proved to be a hit!

The AICR Healthy Recipe C-CAP Winner 2015For the last three years now, AICR has partnered with the C-CAP (Careers through Culinary Arts Programs) for their annual cooking competition. High school students enrolled in vocational culinary programs are encouraged to submit a recipe, given specific guidelines, in the hopes that they will have the winning recipe. This year students created small plates or appetizers that followed AICR’s evidence-based guidelines for lowering cancer risk.

Here, Kristopher shares his experience in the competition, what inspires him, and his plans for the future.

Was it challenging to develop a dish given AICR’s nutrition guidelines?

Yes, it was a little challenging because I was asked to work with ingredients that I was unfamiliar with and that I don’t really deal with coming from a Puerto Rican background. The development process involved a lot of research of ingredients as well as trial and error. Continue reading

Like Seaweed and Quail Eggs? How trying new foods may link to a healthy weight

Polenta, quinoa, kimchi or seaweed – have you tried these foods, or even cooked with them? If so, you might be an adventurous eater – getting a thrill from seeking out and trying foods less familiar to most Americans. According to a new study, you might even weigh less than people who are less adventurous. And a healthy weight is one important factor for keeping risk low for many cancers, including colorectal, postmenopausal breast and kidney.

Published in the journal Obesitythe study authors set out to look at whether being willing to try new or different foods might relate to weight (BMI). Although some earlier studies found that eating more of a variety of foods links to higher BMI, in those cases variety meant eating more foods at one time. Here, the researchers wanted to look at women they describe as “neophiles” – adventurous eaters who enjoy trying new foods.

The 501 women in the study ranged from age 20-35 and they averaged slightly above a healthy weight, 43% Caucasian, with about one-quarter each Black and Hispanic. Continue reading