Study: Eating Vegetarian (+Fish) Lowers Colorectal Cancer Risk

A new study that adds to the evidence on diet and colorectal cancer suggests that vegetarians have a lower risk of this cancer than non-vegetarians, with fish-eaters — pescovegetarians — showing the lowest risk of the non-meat eating groups. Delicious  portion of fresh salmon fillet  with aromatic herbs,

The study was published yesterday in JAMA Internal Medicine and it will be a part of AICR/WCRF’s ongoing collection of the worldwide research. The latest AICR/WCRF report on colorectal cancer concluded that diets high in red meat increase the risk of colorectal cancer.

The study collected the eating and other lifestyle habits of almost 78,000 Seventh-Day Adventists, a group that traditionally advocates vegetarian and healthy eating. Researchers categorized the group into those who ate meat regularly and four vegetarian patterns: 1) ate fish regularly; 2) ate milk and eggs regularly 3) ate small amounts of meats and fish; and 4) ate no meats, dairy or any animal food (vegans).

Overall, vegetarians had lower BMI, ate less fat, red meat, and processed meat, and ate more fiber.

Slightly more than half the study population was categorized as vegetarians. Over 7 years, there were 490 cases of colorectal cancer. Continue reading


Rising Colorectal Cancer Rates Among the Young; Prevention Key

Over the past three decades there’s been a slight but steady decline in colorectal cancer incidence here in the US, thanks in large part to increased screening. Now a study out this week showing that rates of this cancer are increasing among young people — below the typical screening age — highlights the importance of people of all ages adopting healthy behaviors that can halve the risk of colorectal cancer.Picture 83

The study – published in JAMA Surgery – found that among 20- to 34-year-olds, the data indicates incidence of colon and rectal cancer will increase by 90% and 124%, respectively, by 2030. Among the 35 to 49 year olds, rates are estimated to increase by 28% and 46%, respectively.

This large study confirms previous research on incidence trends, and it points to a growing public health problem, the authors note. Lifestyle and behavioral factors such as obesity may be a possible cause.

AICR estimates that half of all colorectal cancer cases are preventable if people were to eat healthier diets, move more and stay lean.

Continue reading


Treat Dad to Brazilian Chicken

brazilian-chicken cropped2Even the pickiest Dad will enjoy the unique combination of cancer-preventive ingredients in our Health-e-Recipe for Brazilian Chicken with Black Beans. It’s a hearty alternative to red or processed meat on Father’s Day.

Red or processed meat can increase risk of colorectal cancer, according to AICR’s Continuous Update Report findings. So combining chicken with delicious black beans in this recipe yields 32 grams of protein, balanced with five different vegetables. The Brazilian flavor comes from nutmeg, fresh orange, parsley and cayenne pepper.

Serve it up with brown rice or another whole grain, plus a salad of dark leafy greens, tomatoes and carrots, dressed with olive oil-balsamic vinaigrette and topped with some chopped avocado to continue the South American theme.

Find more excellent cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.