Coffee One Way to Cut Endometrial Cancer Risk

Coffee lovers are likely enjoying a new study finding that coffee lowers risk for endometrial cancer, with the drink being almost the lone dietary factor linked to risk. The study was a large one and it’s coffee findings are similar to those of AICR’s report released last year.22007913_s

That’s certainly good news for coffee lovers, but whether you do or don’t enjoy coffee, the beverage is only one of several ways you can protect yourself against endometrial cancer.

The study, published in this month’s Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, looked at 84 foods and/or nutrients related to endometrial cancer risk. Study researchers first investigated the link among about 300,000 women participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Women had filled out questionnaires about what they ate and other lifestyle habits, and then they were tracked for endometrial diagnosis or death. This led to 10 factors linked to either increased or decreased risk, including coffee, total fat, butter, and cheese.

Then the researchers looked at how these factors linked to 155,000 women who were in two US studies, the Nurses’ Health Studies I and II. These women had also had answered questions about diet and other factors. Continue reading

Study: Coffee Lowers Risk of Deadly Skin Cancer

A new study published this week adds to the emerging evidence linking coffee to lower risk of some cancers, giving coffee lovers another excuse to drink up.Coffee. Coffee Espresso. Cup Of Coffee

This time, researchers found a lower risk of malignant melanoma in older adults with the highest coffee intake. Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer in the U.S. and the deadliest form of skin cancer, but exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV) and sunburns are the only key risk factors within your control, according to the National Cancer Institute.

The new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute included nearly 450,000 non-Hispanic white participants. Participants answered questions about their coffee intake and then were followed for an average of 10.5 years to see if they developed a non-invasive melanoma, known as melanoma in situ, or malignant melanoma.

Those with coffee intake of more than 4 cups per day had a 20% lower risk of malignant melanoma compared to non-coffee drinkers. High intake of regular coffee and total caffeine, but not decaffeinated coffee, were also associated with a lower risk of malignant melanoma. There was no link between coffee intake and melanoma in situ. Continue reading

What We Googled in 2014 on Food, Drinks and Cancer

Here at AICR, we’re well versed in the latest scientific evidence on food, drink, and cancer prevention. We also know that a lot of people get their health information online, where it can be difficult to separate fact from fiction. So what were we searching for this year, when it comes to cancer and foods and drinks? We used the 2014 Google Trends to find out.19024481_s

Alcohol and cancer
This was the most popular search term involving cancer and a specific food or drink, for good reason. The latest research has found that alcohol increases the risk of some cancers, including breast and colorectal. Based on the evidence, AICR recommends that if you do drink alcohol, limit your drinks to 1 per day for women or 2 per day for men.

Coffee and cancer
Coffee had a lot of people searching this year and the news is good for coffee drinkers. While scientists early on used to think coffee increased risk for certain cancers, research now shows a lack of association or even a beneficial effect for cancer risk. In 2013, our latest report on endometrial cancer found that drinking coffee – whether decaf or regular – is associated with a lower risk of this cancer. We’ll drink to that! Continue reading