Study: Overweight Girls, Teens Face Increased Colorectal Cancer Risk Decades Later

Girls who are overweight as young children and teens may face increased risk for colorectal cancer decades later, regardless of what they weigh as adults, suggests a new study published in Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. The study is partially funded by AICR. canstockphoto8674628

In an unexpected finding, the same link for overweight boys and adult colorectal cancer was not found.

While the link between overweight adult and higher risk of developing colorectal cancer is clear — for both women and men — the role of excess body fat as a child is an emerging area of research.

For the study, researchers pulled data from almost 110,000 people who were part of two large and long-term population studies. One included only women, the Nurses’ Health Study, and the other men, the Health Professionals Follow-up study.

Back in 1988, everyone had picked from a set of nine body shapes on what they looked like at ages 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40, along with their current age. Then everyone regularly answered questionnaires about their weight, activity, diet and other lifestyle habits. Continue reading

Kids, Pizza and Cancer Prevention

Pizza is popular – for kids’ parties, family night out and even late night snacks. But pizza can pack a lot of calories and that can lead to weight gain, which can increase cancer risk. Child Preparing Pizza

A study published yesterday in the journal Pediatrics dissects the role pizza plays in weight and nutrition for children and adolescents. Although the researchers found that overall, daily calories from pizza are lower than a decade ago, children and adolescents who eat pizza also consume more calories, saturated fat and salt each day than non-pizza eaters.

Study authors also found that if the pizza was from a fast food restaurant or was eaten as a snack, it added even more calories than if the pizza was from school cafeterias or from home. Overall, teens averaged about 320 calories more per day when eating pizza from a fast food restaurant than days when they didn’t eat pizza at all.

Being overweight as a kid may lead to being overweight as an adult. Overweight and obese adults have an increased risk for many common cancers, type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases.

How can you help your child learn to enjoy pizza as a meal, treat or even as a healthful contribution to their diet? Check out our blog where I give a few tips on how to order and make a healthier pizza.

Celebrate the 4th with Red, White and Blue Popsicles

fruit-popsicleOur Health-e-Recipe for Berry Cherry Yogurt Popsicles is an easy-to-make summer treat for this 4th of July, especially with kids. And it’s healthier and lower in calories than many store-bought popsicles.

Berries and cherries are packed with cancer-preventing compounds including anthocyanins and ellagic acid, plus vitamin C. They may seem more expensive than other fruits, but they cost less now that they are in season and not much more than chips and other packaged foods.

Greek vanilla yogurt contains less sugar and more protein than frozen dairy desserts. And you can use fresh cherries or blackberries, too, but buying frozen unsweetened versions skips having to pit fresh cherries. If kids are helping you, note that berry juice can stain clothing so wear aprons or old shirts before starting.

Paper cups and popsicle sticks are cheap and easy to find. You can just tear off the cups when the popsicles have frozen, or just freeze without the popsicle sticks and use spoons to eat out of the cup. Enjoy these delicious pops as desserts or snacks.

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