Women Exercising as Teens Live Longer, Die Less from Cancer

If you’re a woman and getting at least 30 minutes a day of activity, that means a lower risk of colorectal cancer. Now a study published today suggests that women who exercised as teens for even an hour a week have a lower risk of dying from cancer in middle age and older compared to teens who weren’t active at all.Teenager Skater Girl Legs On A Skate Board

These women are also more likely to live longer overall, the study suggests, whether they exercised as adults or not.

The study included almost 75,000 Chinese women who were part of the  Shanghai Women’s Health Study. The women were 40 to 70 years old and they had answered questions about their lifestyle habits currently and decades earlier.

After an average of 13 years, the researchers looked how many of the women had died overall, and whether the cause of death was from cancer or cardiovascular disease.

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Does My Yogurt Have Too Much Added Sugar? Tell the FDA You Want to Know

If you’re trying to boost your healthy diet and cut cancer risk by cutting back on added sugars – do you know how much added sugar is in your fruit yogurt? What about that energy drink? And would you understand how that amount of sugar fits into a healthy diet? If not, you have the opportunity to let the FDA know you want food labels to have clear information about added sugar in your food. It’s powerful knowledge to help in your food purchasing choices.

Added sugars are any sugars that food manufacturers add to the product, which means it doesn’t count the natural sugars in fruits and other plant foods. Foods and drinks with added sugar can lead to overweight and obesity, and too much body fat causes almost 122,000 cases of cancer in the US every year, so that knowledge IS important.

The FDA had already decided to include added sugars on the new Nutrition Facts label, but after testing different labels, they found consumers want to know how that amount of added sugar in their yogurt fits into their diet – is it a small amount or too much?

Current and Proposed Nutrition Label. %DV is based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Current and Proposed Nutrition Label. %DV is based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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Study: For Women, Young and Older, Alcohol Ups Breast Cancer Risk

Research clearly shows that alcohol increases risk for breast cancer overall. Now, a study published this week in the International Journal of Cancer finds that drinking alcohol increases risk for nearly all breast tumor types, especially when women start drinking as young adults. The risk is modest, but it shows one way women can take steps to lower their risk.alcohol-serving-sizes

Using data from the European Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) study, researchers included 335,000 women from ten European countries and of those,11,576 participants had breast cancer diagnoses after an average of 11 years follow-up. Data on participants included BMI, waist to hip ratio, smoking status, physical activity, education level and diet information. The authors calculated how much alcohol women drank over their life, based on surveys the women filled out on what they drank in their 20s and beyond. About 15% of the women drank more than one alcoholic drink daily. Continue reading