6 Healthy gift ideas for kids

Last week we highlighted 10 Unique Gifts for Good Health to help your loved ones find creative ways to move more and eat smart — which will help them lower their risk for cancer. Most ideas were for adults, but the holidays are a lot about kids. And developing healthy habits during childhood can help kids stay lean as adults, which will reduce their risk of adult cancers.

Here, we asked the experts and health enthusiasts for gift ideas that will have kids excited, engaged, AND help their health:

illustration of music background in doodle style

  1. The Gift of Music. Dancing is a great way to be physically active for cancer prevention. Artists like the Singing Lizard are making tunes that both kids and adults can enjoy. So, get the music going, put on your dancing shoes and get the party started.

 

 

2. Garden Kits. Encourage healthy eating habits pizza garden by having kids grow their own vegetables and fruits. Growums garden kits are specially designed for kids with easy to follow instructions and a website full of interactive games. With kits like “Stir-Fry Garden” and “Pizza Garden” kids are sure to dig these gifts.

 

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Cancer-Fighting Thanksgiving Veggies: Good for Your Wallet and Your Waist

Two holiday food cost reports from USDA and the Farm Bureau have great news for your health and your wallet. With all the seasonal vegetables to choose from, your Thanksgiving feast can be delicious, nutritious, cancer-preventive and affordable.

In one report, USDA calculated the cost for a one cup prepared portion of the most popular Thanksgiving vegetables, including carrots, pumpkin, Brussels sprouts and green beans. You can serve one cup of most of these veggies for less than 75 cents each. Among the most economical are fresh carrots (29 cents), sweet potatoes (50 cents), white potatoes (18 cents), and frozen green beans (38 cents).

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It’s What You Eat – Not Just Where You Eat

Last Friday, a new study prompted headlines proclaiming that eating away from home and eating fast food may not link to obesity. Today, we’re hearing about a study from a scientific meeting showing that eating more homemade meals links to lower risk for type 2 diabetes.

Both obesity and type 2 diabetes link to many common cancers, including colorectal, liver and postmenopausal breast. But with seemingly contradictory take-aways, you may be left wondering – does it really matter where and what I eat?

Yes, it does!

Here’s what the researchers agree on: Continue reading