Healthy, Hearty Sweet Potato Bean Soup

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Photo by Heather Victoria Photography

Beans have always come in handy when animal proteins were scarce; now they can stand in for red meat when you’re trying to cut back to eating no more than 3 ounces of lean red meat per day, as AICR recommends for lower cancer risk.

For a warming and satisfying meal, look no further than our Health-e-Recipe for Sweet Potato Bean Soup. Almost a stew, This rich-tasting soup is based on a rich low-sodium chicken broth enhanced with tomato paste, a product high in the protective phytochemical lycopene.

Simmered with nutritious onions and celery, chopped sweet potato chunks add plenty of the cancer-preventive phytochemical beta-carotene (also present in other orange vegetables and fruits, like carrots). Continue reading


No, Cancer Isn’t Just “Bad Luck”

A paper published recently in the journal Science has generated an enormous amount of media coverage. The paper’s matter-of-fact title, “Variation in Cancer Incidence Among Tissues Can Be Explained By the Number of Stem Cell Divisions,” doesn’t sound like something that would set the internet buzzing, but it sure did.
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That’s because of how the paper was promoted and covered: “MOST CANCERS DUE TO BAD LUCK, NOT PREVENTABLE, STUDY FINDS” screamed one headline. But there’s a sharp disconnect between this paper’s findings and the hype surrounding it.

Here at AICR, we fund and analyze the research showing that a healthy weight, a healthy diet and regular physical activity could prevent hundreds of thousands of U.S. cancers every year. We’re concerned that the oversimplified coverage this study received will reinforce the widespread conviction that cancer “just happens” and cause Americans to throw up their hands and ignore the empowering, evidence-based message that everyday choices play an important protective role in risk for many of the most common cancers.

When looking at this paper, ask yourself three basic questions. Continue reading


Study: Less TV, More Walking May Help Colorectal Cancer Survivors Live Longer

There’s strong research now showing that being active can reduce your risk of colorectal cancer, but how physical activity affects survivors of this cancer is not as clear. Now comes a study suggesting that being active — both before and after diagnosis —can lengthen survival for colorectal cancer survivors.dreamstime_17313188

Not watching a lot of television — a common measure for sedentary living — was also found to improve survival. Survivors who were watching fewer than two hours a day of TV before diagnosis had a reduced risk of mortality compared to those watching five or more hours of TV a day.

The study was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology last week.

For pre-diagnosis, study authors used data from approximately 3,800 survivors who were part of the large NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study study. In the mid 1990s, the participants were 50 to 71 years old. They answered questionnaires about how much TV they watched, their activity and other lifestyle habits. Those who had developed colorectal cancer were identified in 2006. Continue reading