Make-Ahead Healthy Lunches, Your Way

AICR’s Recipe March Madness – down to the Final 4 today – inspired me to share a recent kick I’ve been on to make a one-pot dish on Sunday that I pack for lunches throughout the week. With a little preparation and planning (and it doesn’t take much!) I end up with about 5 delicious and inexpensive lunches filled with cancer-protective nutrients.canstockphoto14256168

I start with a grain and cook 1 cup dry (to yield about 2 to 3 cups cooked) according to package instructions. Lately I’ve been using quinoa because it cooks fast, is delicious and packed full of protein and fiber, but you could also use brown rice, farro, bulgur or another whole grain. I cook it in a low sodium vegetable broth instead of water to give it a little extra flavor. Once cooked, let the grain cool in the fridge.

Next I pick a few ingredients to mix in, always with some added vegetables and/or fruit. Then I pack it into individual containers so I can grab for lunch in the mornings.

Here are three versions you can make with a few simple additions to the already prepared grain-base. When you make dishes like this, you can change the ingredients based on what you have around! Continue reading


Your County’s Health and Cancer Risk

The latest report on county health rankings found, once again, where you live makes a  difference to how long you live and your health. The least healthy counties have twice the death rates as the nation’s healthiest, according to the report. Wepeople_03

This is the fifth annual County Health Rankings, a report that compiles data on mortality and 29 health factors, including many that relate to cancer risk. For these factors, the findings are slightly encouraging for the nation. These include:

  • Obesity: Obesity rates for adults are holding steady with a rate of 28 percent for 2012. Prior, obesity rates increased from 16 percent of adults in 1995 to 28 percent in 2010. Aside from smoking, obesity is now the single largest risk factor for cancer. The latest research shows that obesity is a cause of 8 cancers, including post-menopausal breast, ovarian and endometrial. Continue reading


At the Summit: Partnerships and Actions to Reduce Childhood Obesity

Last week’s 2014 summit of the Partnership for a Healthier America showed inspiring results from a growing number of non-profit, government and corporate collaborations for “Building a Healthier Future.”

The conference focused on how the many sectors in our society can support children – and Americans in general – in reducing obesity levels. And that’s important for cancer prevention, because after not smoking, obesity is the single largest risk factor for cancer.

Celebrating its fourth year, the Partnership’s meeting was graced by uplifting remarks from First Lady Michelle Obama, whose initiative Let’s Move to reduce childhood obesity and increase physical activity and healthy eating in hundreds of schools has been pivotal for the public-private partnerships now expanding that theme. Continue reading