Friends, Family and Weight Loss: How You Can Help Me

Last week Sonja helped us with choosing apps for keeping food records – one strategy research shows is key for successful weight loss. Another crucial piece to the weight management puzzle – and making healthier choices – is being able to rely on support from family, friends and colleagues.Two Overweight Women On Diet Eating Healthy Meal In Kitchen

That’s important because getting to and staying a healthy weight is AICR’s first recommendation for cancer prevention. Too much body fat increases risk for eight cancers, including colorectal, postmenopausal breast, and endometrial cancers.

When you experience a setback in your weight loss efforts, you might think you just need more willpower or to be mentally stronger, but research shows that even with our best efforts, those around us affect our weight loss success. I saw that dynamic in action too many times in my work with college students trying to lose weight. They’d be making progress with eating less junk food or finding ways to be more active, and then time at home with family and friends could quickly seem to undo the good work.

But you can change that. You may be starting new habits this fall making positive eating or activity changes, so how can you make sure you have the support you need? Here are 3 tips to help you garner positive help from those around you: Continue reading


Increasing Waistlines and Cancer Risk

Americans’ waistlines are widening, finds a new study, even as our weight appears to be holding steady. The findings are important for cancer risk — along with other diseases — because while obesity is a clear cause of cancers, abdominal obesity may also independently increase risk.canstockphoto17693287

The study, published in JAMA, found that Americans’ average waist circumference increased progressively slightly more than an inch from 1999 to 2012. During those years, waists bumped up from 37.6 to 38.8 inches.

Prevalence also increased, with over half of Americans now having abdominal obesity. Prevalence rose from 46 percent in 1999 to 54 percent in 2012, among both men and women.

The study included 32,816 participants who were part of multiple national surveys from 1999-2000 to 2011-2012. Previous analyses of data from the same surveys show that obesity did not change much from 2003 to 2012, the authors write. Continue reading


Report: Half of Cancer Deaths Can Be Prevented

More than half of the estimated cancer deaths projected to occur in the United States this year are related to preventable causes, states a major report on cancer research released yesterday by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

Source: AACR Cancer Progress Report 2014.

Source: AACR Cancer Progress Report 2014.

AACR’s fourth Cancer Progress Report focuses on diagnosis and treatment, but a significant part of the report highlights the research in prevention, using World Cancer Research Fund and AICR findings, along with other data.

Here at AICR, we focus on how diet, foods, weight and activity link to cancer risk. With changes to those lifestyle factors, AICR estimates that approximately one of every three cancer cases are preventable.

Using data that includes vaccines, sun exposure, smoking and other facts, the AACR report says that more than 50 percent of the 585,720 cancer deaths expected to occur in the United States in 2014 will be related to preventable causes.

Knowing that so many thousands of cancers are preventable is far beyond what research knew only a few decades ago. The report also has a great quote from Theodore Roosevelt: “Knowing what’s right doesn’t mean much, unless you do what’s right.”

For strategies and more information on how lifestyle factors relate to each cancer site, visit our new site on prevention.