Tomatoes, Lycopene and Prostate Cancer Risk: Mixed but Promising

In the past several decades, there has been considerable interest in lycopene-rich foods, particularly tomatoes and tomato products, in lowering a man’s risk of getting prostate cancer. In the previous AICR report, the strength of evidence for a benefit was viewed as “probable” for lycopene-rich foods, but in the latest round, the recommendation was lowered to “limited, no conclusion.”elg-color-2

To understand this change, it is important to examine the nature of the evidence used to reach the new conclusion. Most of the evidence is based on studies that record what men are eating, or measure blood lycopene levels, and then follow the men for any diagnosis of prostate cancer.

Then dietary or blood factors are linked to risk of cancer diagnosis. Statistical methods are used to account for other factors. Because these studies are examining associations, which may not necessarily be causal, other considerations such as biologic plausibility are taken into account in formulating the conclusions.

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Cook meals – eat better, new study (it can help prevent cancer too)

We talk a lot about food and eating here because research shows it matters for cancer prevention. Now a study that quantifies the benefits of home cooking finds that if you frequently cook dinner at home you’re more likely to eat fewer calories, both at home and eating out, compared to those who seldom cook.canstockphoto18508832

The study was published in Public Health Nutrition yesterday.

People who cooked dinner the most, at least six nights a week, were eating 137 fewer calories per day on average compared to those cooking dinner only once a week or not at all.

Study authors used data from almost 9,600 adult participants of the government National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants answered questions about how many times they cooked during the past week and what they ate during the past 24 hours, along with questions such as about dieting.

The more people cooked, the less calories they ate. In 8% of adults’ homes, someone was cooking dinner once or less a week. These people were eating on average 2,301 calories a day. Almost half of households – 48% – were cooking dinner six to seven times a Continue reading


Many Unaware Diabetes Ups Cancer Risk, How Lifestyle Can Help

Today is World Diabetes Day and it comes at a time when the US rate of diabetes and those at risk for the disease are higher then ever before. Most are cases of type 2 diabetes, which brings numerous challenges in itself. Many are not aware that this disease also brings an increased risk of several cancers. For those at risk, you can lower it. CancerDiabetesVennx300

A paper back in 2010 found that people with type 2 diabetes are are at twice the increased risk of developing liver, pancreas and endometrium cancers, when compared to those without diabetes. Increased risk is smaller but still evident for cancers of the colon/rectum, post-menopausal breast and bladder.

A June report released by the government show how many men and women face these risks:
– about 1 in 10 US adults have diabetes
– about 1 in 3 are at risk for developing it
– over 1 in 4 adults with diabetes are undiagnosed

The connection between cancers and type 2 diabetes appears to be – in part – due to risk factors shared by both diseases, such as obesity, poor diet and being inactive. The positive is that people can do something about these.

Eating healthy, being active, and getting to then staying a healthy weight can help people with pre-diabetes reduce the risk of many cancers and type 2 diabetes. For those with diabetes, a healthy lifestyle can reduce the risk of cancers and improve management of the disease.

If you are at risk of developing or have diabetes, here, our Nutrition Advisor and expert in this area talks about the cancer-diabetes connections and steps you can take.