Cook dinner at home – save money, eat healthier

By Posted on 4 Comments on Cook dinner at home – save money, eat healthier

If you’re like many people you may think that eating a healthy diet means higher food costs, whether you eat out or cook. But a recent study finds that people who cook more dinners save $2 a day on food – and they have significantly healthier diets than those who cook less often.

This matters for cancer prevention. A healthy diet – one with plenty of vegetables, whole grains and beans, low in sugar and added fat – provides cancer protective nutrients and helps you get to and stay a healthy weight, an important step to lowering cancer risk. Obesity increases risk for many cancers, including colorectal, endometrial and liver.

In this study, researchers surveyed over 400 Seattle residents and gathered data on how often they cooked dinner and ate out, how much they spent on food and beverages, and what they ate and drank. Read more… “Cook dinner at home – save money, eat healthier”

SHARE:

    A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth

    By Posted on 1 Comment on A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth

    A hormone produced by the liver called fibroblast growth factor 21, or FGF21, might play a role in curbing your sweet cravings, suggests a recent study published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

    The brain and gut (which includes the liver) work together in what’s called the central reward system to control what we like and choose to eat – including sweets. Differences in that system can promote unhealthy eating habits, which can lead to obesity, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. Read more… “A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth”

    SHARE:

      AICR Opposes Proposed Cuts to Science, Cancer Prevention Research

      By Posted on 3 Comments on AICR Opposes Proposed Cuts to Science, Cancer Prevention Research

      Health and science research face massive cuts in last week’s proposed White House budget that — if enacted — would set back research on cancer prevention and ultimately cost lives, says the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR).

      The proposed budget for fiscal year 2018 slashes the National Institutes of Health funding by 5.8 billion dollars, approximately 19 percent. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the National Institutes of Health.

      While the proposed budget does not give details on what will be eliminated, AICR stands against any cuts that will slow and possibly irrevocably setback the progress in improving cancer prevention and survivorship.

      In 2017, there will be an estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases. Over 600,920 people living in the United States will die from this disease. Research over the past few decades has led to a greater understanding of what drives cancer development and what protects us. Only through analyzing the global research has AICR’s network found many ways in which diet, weight management and physical activity lowers people’s cancer risk.

      Research now shows that hundreds of thousands of US cancer cases can be prevented every year. At a time when the field has come so far, there is an urgent need to continue this research. Only through more study can individuals – and the country – prevent much of the cost, loss and suffering that cancer brings.

      SHARE: