Roasted Veggie Salad: Sweet!

root-veggie-salad croppedRoasting root vegetables brings out their sweetness without adding sugar. Our Health-e-Recipe for Roasted Root Vegetable Salad is an attractive holiday side dish that’s filling, low-calorie and cancer-fighting, too.

This easy recipe requires nothing more than cutting and peeling a few colorful root vegetables: sweet and white potato, carrot, onion, celery and beet. Their protective phytochemicals reinforce each other to protect you from cancer while adding beautiful hues to your plate.

While they roast, mix up our delicious Mediterranean dressing. Healthy mustard, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, mustard, parsley, cilantro and walnuts are whisked into extra virgin olive oil. A crumble of feta cheese on top of this salad provides a delicious contrasting taste.

Serve at room temperature or chilled. You can even put it on a bed of mixed leafy greens to get more fiber and phytochemicals. Add a whole grain and some lean protein for a complete meal. Find more delicious, cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.

 

 

 

 

 


A Lighter Apple Pie

square-apple-pie coppedIf you and your family love apple pie on Thanksgiving, try a healthy new spin on this holiday favorite with our Health-e-Recipe for Square Apple Pie.

The pieces may be square, but we’ve cut corners on calories by using less high-fat pastry and sugar. Instead, our recipe is a lighter treat that’s perfect for following a heavy meal and it’s loaded with fresh apples.

All apples provide cancer-preventive flavonoid phytochemicals and fiber, especially when you leave the peel on. They also contain the antioxidant vitamin C and pectin, a substance that may help lower cholesterol. The best apples for baking are tarts ones like green Granny Smith, Fuji, Cortland, Northern Spy or Winesap.

If you’re inclined to add whipped or ice cream to your pie, why not serve a sugarless, fat-free version or a dollop of low-fat vanilla yogurt, frozen or not.

Find more delicious, nutritious recipes for cancer prevention at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our Health-e-Recipes.


Cooking for the Family… Gluten-free, Vegan and All

dreamstime_xs_32728722From vegetarian to vegan, diabetic to gluten-free, is your family’s table one of the many Thanksgiving spreads looking to please special diet restrictions?

These diet restrictions mean you have to make changes to traditional recipes and this may present a lot of “hangups” for both the rookie holiday host and the tenured chef of the family. We can lend a helping hand.

Makeover #1: Stuffing, Gluten free

This staple is usually made with bread, which contains a protein called gluten.  People with celiac disease must avoid gluten completely; others may be sensitive to gluten and experience intestinal discomfort. Here are a few suggestions for your gluten-free diners:

Makeover #2: Macaroni and cheese, healthier version

Please vegetarians or non-turkey lovers with a creamy, delicious and healthy mac and cheese dish.

  • For an easy change to a crowd favorite, swap out the regular macaroni noodles for whole-wheat or whole-grain noodles to give your mac and cheese a fiber boost
  • Also, check out AICR’s recipe for Pumpkin Mac & Cheese. Adding pumpkin keeps the familiar creaminess without overloading on cheese
  • If you’re not into pumpkin, try a macaroni and cheese made with a cauliflower cheese sauce. You’ll get your fix of cruciferous veggies, while still enjoying a holiday favorite Continue reading