Does My Yogurt Have Too Much Added Sugar? Tell the FDA You Want to Know

If you’re trying to boost your healthy diet and cut cancer risk by cutting back on added sugars – do you know how much added sugar is in your fruit yogurt? What about that energy drink? And would you understand how that amount of sugar fits into a healthy diet? If not, you have the opportunity to let the FDA know you want food labels to have clear information about added sugar in your food. It’s powerful knowledge to help in your food purchasing choices.

Added sugars are any sugars that food manufacturers add to the product, which means it doesn’t count the natural sugars in fruits and other plant foods. Foods and drinks with added sugar can lead to overweight and obesity, and too much body fat causes almost 122,000 cases of cancer in the US every year, so that knowledge IS important.

The FDA had already decided to include added sugars on the new Nutrition Facts label, but after testing different labels, they found consumers want to know how that amount of added sugar in their yogurt fits into their diet – is it a small amount or too much?

Current and Proposed Nutrition Label. %DV is based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Current and Proposed Nutrition Label. %DV is based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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Think Vegetables are Boring? For Spring Veggies, Try This

If vegetables aren’t the all-star of your meal, and you – like many of my clients – think of vegetables as bland or boring, think again. canstockphoto24567903

With the spring weather upon us, this is a great time of year to increase your intake of fresh seasonal veggies. Vegetables are packed full of vitamins and nutrients that protect your health, including reducing your risk of cancer and heart disease. While you may know this, rather than eating vegetables because you feel like you should eat them, start eating them because you enjoy them.

Below are ten of my favorite ways to flavor your spring-time veggies. Continue reading

Study: To Eat Less, Choose the Right Dining Companion

If you go out to lunch with a skimpy eater, you’ll probably eat a small amount too – even if you are used to eating more, says a new study.

In this study, the authors analyzed 38 studies that looked at how much – or how little – diners’ eating habits affected their dining companions’ portions.

Studies like this can help increase our understanding of the many factors that influence how much people eat and can help you develop effective strategies to achieve a healthy weight. That’s important for cancer prevention because overweight and obesity increases risk for 10 cancers, including colorectal, postmenopausal breast and liver. Continue reading