Chill Out with Fruit Soup

fruit-soup croppedFor a refreshing and healthy change, try ourHealth-e-Recipe for Chilled Fruit Soup with Berries.

Six kinds of fruit go into this slightly tropical tasting soup. First, cubed cantaloupe and both fresh and frozen strawberries and blended together with apples into a delicious pink colored liquid with a touch of lemon juice and sugar. Cantaloupe contains beta-carotene and strawberries supply you with vitamin C, while apples are a good source of cancer-fighting compounds like flavonoids.

Then fresh raspberries and blueberries decorate the soup, adding their own protective compounds of ellagic acid and anthocyanins. With only 140 calories per serving, you get 5 grams of fiber and a winning soup or smoothie to sip. If you refrigerate any leftover soup and it separates, just stir it up before serving a second time.

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A Tempting Cauliflower Treat

cauliflower-x2172 cropped2Crunchy, cool and cancer-preventive, our Health-e-Recipe for Cool Cauliflower Salad is low in calories and abundant with flavor.

Just because cauliflower is white and not green, like its cruciferous relative broccoli, doesn’t mean it’s lacking in powerful phytochemicals that may help ward off cancer. Along with cauliflower and broccoli, cruciferous vegetables include cabbage, Brussels sprouts, turnips, kale, collard greens, radishes, parsley and watercress.

At 50 calories a serving, this tasty salad can also be a heartily portioned snack. Vegetables are naturally low in calorie density and high in fiber and water. That means they fill you up for not too many calories, compared to equal amounts of high calorie-dense foods that have lots of fat and sugar. That’s why eating a mostly plant-based diet of minimally processed foods can help keep off extra pounds while giving you protection from plenty of cancer-fighting phytochemicals.

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Weight Loss, Cancer Prevention and Health: Why Vegetables and Fruits Matter

If you’ve been working hard to eat more broccoli or blueberries, headlines like “Fruits and vegetables don’t lead to weight loss, study says” can drive you crazy. You may wonder if it’s worth the effort. I certainly hear from people questioning whether they can trust any nutrition and weight loss messages when they see headlines like these.NAP-Plate-v02

Make no mistake about it, fruits and vegetables are a key part of a cancer-preventive diet. And they can play a role in getting to and staying a healthy weight – important for lowering risk for eight cancers and other chronic diseases. Even the authors of that recent study acknowledge that in their paper. So why the confusing messages?

Here’s what that study was about: The authors say that health organizations promote increasing veggies and fruit for weight loss without explaining the need to also decrease overall calories. So they looked for studies that tested the idea that simply adding vegetables and fruit to your diet will lead to weight loss. Continue reading