Barbecue Favorite: Healthy Chicken Kebabs

chicken-kabobsFor your Memorial Day barbecue this year, try our Mediterranean-style Cypriot Chicken Kebabs.

Perfect for a summer meal, these kebabs can be baked or grilled. The chicken is marinated overnight in a tasty blend of extra virgin olive oil, apple cider vinegar, mustard, oregano, garlic and parsley. Then it is skewered with cherry tomatoes, chunks of zucchini and pieces of red bell pepper. All of these plant-based foods contain cancer-fighting compounds.

Dip your juicy chicken kebabs into the summery green dressing of mint, peas, cumin, garlic and lemon juice. With only 200 calories per serving, you can serve these kebabs with brown rice or another whole grain to soak up the juices, plus a mixed green salad.

Find more healthy, colorful and appetizing dishes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.  


Calories or Carbs? Weight, Health and Cancer Prevention

A calorie is a calorie – eat too many and you’ll gain weight; eat less and you’ll lose weight. Sounds simple, but a New York Times article by two obesity researchers is making headlines, and they question whether focusing on calories alone is really the answer for weight loss. It’s an important issue because obesity links to eight different cancers.Healthy versus unhealthy.

Their hypothesis, published last Friday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, proposes that the driving force for obesity in America is because we eat too many refined carbohydrates – chips, cakes, soft drinks, sugary foods and refined grains – rather than just too many calories. They say eating these foods can lead to higher insulin levels and an environment in our body that promotes fat storage. Their proposal that type of food is more important than total calories for both becoming obese and for losing weight is interesting, but does need more research.

What research is clear on – we know that cutting back on sugary foods and drinks and other refined carbohydrate foods is one important strategy in a total program for health and weight loss. And substituting whole plant foods like vegetables, fruits and whole grains can help lower cancer risk. Continue reading


Study: More Veggies and Fewer Calories May Help Slow Global Warming

At the same time that global warming is making news, a study suggests that eating more fruits, vegetables and nuts and less meat and alcohol — with fewer calories –  can reduce greenhouse gas emission by almost 20 percent, compared to the average diet. Many of the dietary patterns identified as environmentally healthy align with AICR’s recommendations for cancer prevention.Carbon footprint

The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, is one of the first that takes into account foods nutrition along with its environmental impact.

Last month, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) released estimates showing that greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture was on the rise.

This study used greenhouse gas emissions related to farming and production as a measure of a food’s environmental impact. That includes methane produced by cows and fertilizers applied to crops.

For the study, researchers analyzed the diets of almost 2,000 French adults who were part of a nationally representative diet survey. Researchers categorized the foods into groups, calculating how its nutrients and calories contributed to a person’s overall daily diet. They also looked at how much the foods cost. Continue reading