Tell Us Your Favorite Cancer-Protective Recipes: Vote!

Beginning today, we’re kicking off a month-long celebration of our recipes with Recipe March Madness brackets, as we’re preparing for our 500th issue of Health-e-Recipe.Spices and old recipe book on wooden background.

We asked colleagues, friends and dietitians for their favorites and narrowed the field to the 16 most popular recipes. You’ll find  four categories – Appetizers, Side Dishes, Entrees and Desserts. Vote for your favorite here in each category and then come back to vote again every week. The winner will headline on April 15.

AICR has created and shared recipes – from our 1980s paper newsletter to our emailed version today – because we know that what you eat plays a pivotal role in lowering your cancer risk.

Today you can easily find recipes online – from websites, twitter, pinterest and facebook. But it isn’t easy to find tested and tasted recipes that combine health and cancer prevention with flavor. Continue reading


Added Sugars: Soda versus Food

Added sugar is making a lot of news lately. Last week, I wrote about the FDA’s proposed new Nutrition Facts label that would show how much sugar is added to foods. This week, the World Health Organization (WHO) released their new recommendation for an upper limit on how much added sugar we eat. They now say that no more than 5% of total daily calories should come from added sugars – about 100 calories, or 25 grams of sugar – for an adult.

Twenty-five grams of added sugar is not much. Check out the table below to see two ways you’d reach that daily limit – one way is pure sugar, another includes foods with cancer fighting compounds.

A sugary soda (8-ounces) vs. 4 delicious, healthful foods
Bottle of soda isolated on white background. Clipping Path
25 grams
=
Healthy breakfast
6 grams
Vanilla yogurt over strawberries banana and blueberries isolated on white.
11 grams
Raspberry jam dripping from a spoon isolated on white background
3 grams
Delicious chocolates closeup on white background
5 grams

Added sugar is a concern, especially in sugary beverages, because it contributes to overweight and obesity which is linked to 7 cancers, including colorectal, postmenopausal and endometrial.

For those interested, WHO is accepting public comments on this recommendation.


A Fresh Topping for Pasta

rigatoni-and-red-peppers cropped copyWho knew that a delicious pasta dish could fit into a cancer-preventive diet? Our Health-e-Recipe for Rigatoni with Red Peppers fortifies with phytochemical-rich vegetables and fiber, which reduces risk of colorectal cancer.

Whole-wheat pasta has fiber plus protective compounds inherent in whole grains. If you can’t find whole-wheat rigatoni for this dish, try a similar type of bite-size whole-grain pasta, such as penne, rotini or macaroni.

Lightly sautéed red onion, red bell pepper, cherry tomatoes and spinach to toss with the pasta. You’ll be getting powerful onion phytochemicals, vitamin C in the peppers and tomatoes and lutein from the spinach, all reinforcing each other with health-protection benefits. They’re a fresh change from bottled pasta sauce. Topped with fresh basil and Parmesan, this dish is a tasty and low-calorie way to welcome the spring.

Find more cancer-fighting recipes and information about National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.