Study: Obesity Links to More Advanced Breast Cancer among African Americans

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The evidence is clear that obesity and greater abdominal fat increases the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer; obesity decreases the risk of pre-menopausal breast cancer. Yet the majority of research in the field has been conducted among Caucasians.

A study presented today suggests that higher BMI increases the risk of a more advanced cancer diagnosis among women of African ancestry.

The study by Elisa V. Bandera, a researcher at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, was a poster session today at the American Association for Cancer Research’ annual meeting.

“We know the effect of obesity on breast cancer among white women, there’s a wide literature on the topic,” said lead author Bandera, who is also an expert panelist on AICR’s Continuous Update Project. “In general, African Americans tend to have breast cancer at an earlier age and it is more advanced, we know something different is going on, we want to find out what.” Read more… “Study: Obesity Links to More Advanced Breast Cancer among African Americans”

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    Cadmium, Breast Cancer, Veggies and Whole Grains: One Study

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    A new Swiss study that suggests dietary cadmium may increase breast cancer risk is intriguing, but a strong body of evidence shows that women should not shy away from eating whole grains and other healthy foods to reduce their risk of this disease.

    The study, published in Cancer Research, estimated the amount of cadmium almost 56,000 women were consuming. Cadmium is a metal found in low amounts in the soil, air and water.

    Study researchers estimated the dietary cadmium by asking the women about their diet when the study began in 1987. They then used national data to estimate cadmium content for each food and divided the women into three groups of cadmium consumption: low, medium, and high.

    Then the women were tracked for approximately 12 years.

    When looking at only the women who consumed the highest amounts of whole grains and vegetables, the highest dietary cadmium group linked to a 21 percent increase in post-menopausal breast cancer compared to those in the lowest group.

    Read more… “Cadmium, Breast Cancer, Veggies and Whole Grains: One Study”

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      A Thank You for Supporting Breast Cancer Research (and Survivor Video)

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      All of us at AICR know it can be tough to decide which cancer research organizations to support. The headlines over the last few days may have been unsettling for some — but it’s a reminder that funding cancer research is important, and that public support is central to the collective effort to stop cancer. 

      That’s why we want you to know that your donation to AICR funds vital cancer research and the development of tools that help millions of people prevent and survive cancer.

      Our research has shown, for example, that 2 in 5 breast cancers could be prevented through healthy everyday choices — that’s 74,000 cases every year, in the US alone. Read more… “A Thank You for Supporting Breast Cancer Research (and Survivor Video)”

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