Ultra processed foods like packaged snacks, chicken nuggets, associated with cancer risk

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Most Americans are probably aware that a steady diet of foods like chicken nuggets, candy bars and sodas are not a path to health, yet their low cost and easy access  mean these foods are becoming a regular part of many people’s diets in the US and around the world. AICR’s research shows that highly processed foods with added fats and sugars contribute to weight gain and having obesity, thus raising the risk for cancers such as colorectal, endometrial and post-menopausal breast. Now, a population study explores whether there is a direct association between eating these ultra-processed foods and cancer risk.

Consumption of ultra-processed foods and cancer risk, published in the British Medical Journal used data from a French cohort called the NutriNet-Santé study, established in 2009, to look at associations between food, nutrition and health. For this study, researchers reviewed diet records from about 105,000 adults to determine the percentage of ultra-processed foods in their diets, using a food processing classification system called NOVA. The ultra-processed group includes foods such as sodas, sweet or savory packaged snacks, mass produced packaged breads and pastries, chicken and fish nuggets, sausages, and packaged instant soups and noodles. Read more… “Ultra processed foods like packaged snacks, chicken nuggets, associated with cancer risk”

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    In the News: Asparagus and Breast Cancer

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    A recent study, published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature, has attracted significant attention and created considerable confusion in recent weeks. The title of the study simply states “Asparagine bioavailability governs metastasis in a model of breast cancer.” As a scientist, when I read the study, the caveats implicit in this title are clear. The key words of caution regarding this study are “in a model of breast cancer.” This clearly indicates to the scientific community at least, that the authors are openly acknowledging that this study cannot be interpreted as directly translatable to human patients. However, less cautious interpretations of this study have led to extraordinary claims being made in the lay press and on social media. Read more… “In the News: Asparagus and Breast Cancer”

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      How I help myself reduce the risk of another recurrence

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      I never thought I’d be in this position.  Fourteen years in, and I continue to have chronic breast cancer. I’m much better now and stronger than I was when my journey first began, yet I still see my oncologist for a maintenance dose of a targeted chemotherapy every three weeks.

      I’ve built my new life around my breast cancer to keep moving forward. One of the best things I’ve learned is to never look back at what might have been. I try to live in the moment and I know that I can only control certain aspects of the future.

      In addition to my maintenance chemo, I spend a lot of my week taking care of myself and doing what I can to improve my health and prevent another recurrence. I eat a healthy diet, exercise almost every day, get enough sleep, and try to live mindfully and as stress-free as I can manage, given the nature of my medical history. Read more… “How I help myself reduce the risk of another recurrence”

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