Study: More Magnesium Links to Lower Insulin Levels

Spinach_canstockphoto0556156Spinach — the dark green leafy source of Popeye’s superhuman strength — is abundant in many nutrients, including magnesium. A new study suggests that diets higher in magnesium are associated with lower blood levels of glucose and insulin, which are often elevated in people with type 2 diabetes.

Research now shows that people with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of certain cancers, including kidney, pancreatic and colorectal.

The study was published online last month in The Journal of Nutrition.

Study researchers analyzed data from approximately 53,000 non-diabetic European men and women from 15 studies who were part of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) study. The individual studies had collected dietary data through questionnaires, interviews, and/or food diaries along with glucose and insulin levels after participants had not eaten for at least 8 hours. Continue reading


Can Green Tea Help Lower Blood Sugar? New Study

Lab research has linked green tea and its compounds to many potential health benefits, including preventing cancer and type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, is a risk factor for diabetes, and having diabetes also increases your chances of getting cancer.

A new animal study now suggests that a compound found in green tea may reduce the spike in blood sugar that occurs after eating starchy foods.

The study was published in the journal Molecular Nutrition & Food Research.

In the study, mice were placed on a corn starch diet to mimic what happens when humans eat starchy foods. The mice were then fed an antioxidant found in green tea called epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). The researchers found that, in mice given EGCG, the blood sugar spike that typically occurs after eating was significantly reduced (about 50% lower) compared to mice that were not fed the antioxidant. Continue reading