Workplace Tools for Healthy Eating and Cancer Prevention

Most of us need to eat at least one meal or make some food choices while we’re on the job, whether putting in an 8 hour day at an office, doing shift work at night or working at home. Those seemingly minor daily food choices add up to make a big difference in our health and weight – affecting our risk for cancer and other diseases like type 2 diabetes and heart disease.http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photography-tomato-plate-image20125697

If you have a cafeteria or local shops and restaurants with healthful choices at prices that work for you, that convenience makes it easier to stick to a healthy eating plan while on the job. But for many, the choices can be bleak, uninspiring and unhealthy.

I like to carry my own lunch, because it’s healthier and more satisfying. But I have challenges packing a lunch consistently – getting all the components into a state for ready-to-pack is often a big barrier for me.

What’s helping me now are my workplace pantry tools – here are some examples of my stash: Continue reading


Men’s Health and Weight Loss: Why a Salad is Cool

A few months ago I wrote about some challenges women face when it comes to weight loss – menopause, pleasing your family, and post-partum weight retention. Obesity is linked to cancer, so it’s important to think about how we can all maintain a healthy weight to decrease our cancer risk. With this being National Men’s Health Week, I’d like to focus on ways to overcome some unique challenges I hear from men who are working to lose weight and stay healthy.canstockphoto

1. “There’s usually lots of beer, nachos or other unhealthy foods when I go out with my friends.”

Whether its watching sports or other get togethers, it’s hard to eat healthy when you’re surrounded by indulgences. Distractions like TV make it even harder to pay attention to what (and how much) you’re eating.

Solution: There are a few ways to make a situation like this easier. First, you can eat before you go. If you aren’t hungry, enjoy the event and the company around you without all the eating and drinking. If you want to drink alcohol, make sure to have a tall glass of water before or after a drink. That’s a good way to stay hydrated and just slow down a bit to limit the number of drinks. Another strategy if you’re at a house gathering, bring healthier foods like raw cut veggies and salsa, and drinks like seltzer water.

2. “A salad isn’t cool.”
You might know what the healthier option is, but it’s hard to select the greens if your friends give you a hard time for ordering something healthy. Continue reading


Like Many, Black and White Breast Cancer Survivors May Need to Exercise More

Like most American women (and men), most breast cancer survivors may also not be exercising enough to reap its many health benefits, suggests a new study. Yet it’s African American survivors who are even less likely to meet the activity recommendations compared to white women.Young Woman In White Sneakers Walking Outdoors

The study was published today in Cancer. It’s important because a lot of research has linked regular physical activity among survivors to to better health and longer lives.

AICR recommends that survivors follow the same activity recommendations as for prevention. Here’s a few examples of studies that have found how activity benefits survivors.

In this study, about 1,700 women diagnosed with breast cancer reported their activity habits both before their diagnosis and six months afterwards. The women ranged in age from 20 to 74, and about half were African American. Researchers converted the women’s activity habits into a common unit of measure: metabolic equivalent hours (METs).

Six months after diagnosis, 59 percent of all the patients reported being less active. Only about one-third of women reported they were active at least 150 minutes per week compared to 60 percent before diagnosis. Continue reading