Like Many, Black and White Breast Cancer Survivors May Need to Exercise More

Like most American women (and men), most breast cancer survivors may also not be exercising enough to reap its many health benefits, suggests a new study. Yet it’s African American survivors who are even less likely to meet the activity recommendations compared to white women.Young Woman In White Sneakers Walking Outdoors

The study was published today in Cancer. It’s important because a lot of research has linked regular physical activity among survivors to to better health and longer lives.

AICR recommends that survivors follow the same activity recommendations as for prevention. Here’s a few examples of studies that have found how activity benefits survivors.

In this study, about 1,700 women diagnosed with breast cancer reported their activity habits both before their diagnosis and six months afterwards. The women ranged in age from 20 to 74, and about half were African American. Researchers converted the women’s activity habits into a common unit of measure: metabolic equivalent hours (METs).

Six months after diagnosis, 59 percent of all the patients reported being less active. Only about one-third of women reported they were active at least 150 minutes per week compared to 60 percent before diagnosis. Continue reading


Wellness Doesn’t Have to Stop When the Workday Starts

June marks the start of National Employee Wellness Month, a time to highlight how fostering and maintaining a culture of wellness in the workplace is more important than ever. With so many Americans affected by obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancer and other health conditions, many people are looking for ways to be healthier in every aspect of their lives. Lowsection of two businesspeople walking up stairs with bags in

According to a study conducted at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, the average full-time American employee works approximately 1,700 hours per year, accounting for nearly 20 percent of their time. The Cleveland Clinic notes that we sit far too much and that prolonged sitting puts individuals at risk for heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Knowing this, where better than work to start taking steps to be more active and improve your health?

That’s why the Strategies to Overcome and Prevent (STOP) Obesity Alliance is again hosting National Employee Wellness Month (NEWM), along with Virgin Pulse, Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease and WorldatWork. We are thrilled that AICR has signed on as a proud supporter. Now in its sixth year, NEWM seeks to motivate both employers and employees to focus on health and develop healthy behaviors that they can stick with, not only for one month, but throughout the year. Continue reading


Water and Diet Soda: What Matters for Cancer Prevention

In the battle of beverages, diet drinks made the headlines this week, beating out water as a weight loss aid according to a new study. Understanding how our food and beverages may affect weight gain or loss is important to cancer prevention, because being overweight or obese is a major risk factor for eight cancers, including colorectal and post-menopausal breast.

The study adds to the limited, but growing body of human research on diet beverages. The role of diet beverages in weight control is controversial, but the role of sugary beverages is not. AICR recommends avoiding sugary sodas and drinks because they are strongly linked to weight gain, overweight and obesity.http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photography-glass-water-cola-image21449207

The study, published online in Obesity, found that of the approximately 300 overweight participants, those consuming the diet beverages lost more weight over 12 weeks than the group consuming water. The difference was small, but significant, with the diet drink group losing an average of 13 lbs and the water group, 9 lbs.

For the trial, one-half of the participants were instructed to drink at least 24 ounces of water daily and not to consume any diet beverages. The other half were told to drink at least 24 ounces of diet drinks, but they could also drink water. Continue reading