Where you eat matters for your health… sort of

In the last week, how many of your meals did you make at home? As our lives get busier and busier, more of us are choosing to eat food away from home and that might play a role in weight gain, suggests a new study. And that in turn could lead to increased cancer risk.

From 1970 to 2012, the percent of food budget Americans spent on food at restaurants, school, work, etc increased from 26% to 43%.

Source: Unites States Department of Agriculture

Fast Food vs Full Service Restaurants

From 2007-2011 US adults consumed an average of 11% of daily calories from fast food. Although there has been a lot of focus put on fast food, we have been increasing our intake from full service restaurants as well. Continue reading

Eat healthy, Be active: New Recommendations to prevent Diabetes, may also prevent cancer

Eat healthy, be physically active. We talk about these recommendations a lot for cancer prevention. Now a major new review of the evidence concludes that if you are one of the 86 million Americans at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, you can reduce your risk of this disease by participating in a program that combines both diet and physical activity. That means you’ll also have lower risk for many cancers.CancerDiabetesVennx300

Reports in the past few years have found that having type 2 diabetes increases the risk of several cancers, such as liver, pancreas, endometrium, colon/rectum, breast, and bladder. We talk about why that might be here with our expert.

Today’s recommendations were published in the Annals of Internal Medicine and they come from the Community Preventive Services Task Force, an independent group of experts. The task force found 53 studies that had programs encouraging people at risk of type 2 diabetes to improve their diet and increase their physical activity. All the programs used trained providers and lasted at least three months, with an average of about a year.

In total, there were 66 programs. Continue reading

Like Seaweed and Quail Eggs? How trying new foods may link to a healthy weight

Polenta, quinoa, kimchi or seaweed – have you tried these foods, or even cooked with them? If so, you might be an adventurous eater – getting a thrill from seeking out and trying foods less familiar to most Americans. According to a new study, you might even weigh less than people who are less adventurous. And a healthy weight is one important factor for keeping risk low for many cancers, including colorectal, postmenopausal breast and kidney.

Published in the journal Obesitythe study authors set out to look at whether being willing to try new or different foods might relate to weight (BMI). Although some earlier studies found that eating more of a variety of foods links to higher BMI, in those cases variety meant eating more foods at one time. Here, the researchers wanted to look at women they describe as “neophiles” – adventurous eaters who enjoy trying new foods.

The 501 women in the study ranged from age 20-35 and they averaged slightly above a healthy weight, 43% Caucasian, with about one-quarter each Black and Hispanic. Continue reading