Reducing your breast cancer risk – top three takeaways from new report

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We just released our Breast Cancer Report, updating the research and findings from 2010. The new 120-page report packs a lot of research, statistics and discussion of lifestyle factors relating to breast cancer risk.

What do all the stats and research mean for you? Here are three of the most important take-aways, the major findings and how you can put them into action.

Physical Activity –

The finding: Moderate and vigorous physical activity lowers risk for postmenopausal breast cancer. Vigorous physical activity lowers risk for pre-menopausal breast cancer Read more… “Reducing your breast cancer risk – top three takeaways from new report”

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    Taxing sugary drinks leads to fewer sales, spurs more water purchases

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    There’s been a lot of news about taxing sugar-sweetened beverages as one way to improve people’s health and raise revenue that could be used for anti-obesity initiatives or other community programs. While controversial, many public health experts think this could be one way to encourage people to consume fewer sugary drinks and therefore help curb obesity in kids and adults.

    AICR recommends avoiding sugary drinks because evidence shows they link to weight gain, overweight and obesity. Obesity increases risk for 11 cancers, including colorectal, pancreatic and endometrial, so strategies that help reduce Americans’ sugary drink consumption play an important role in cancer prevention. Read more… “Taxing sugary drinks leads to fewer sales, spurs more water purchases”

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      Study, That Nutrient Claim on Your Snack Food May Lead You to Buy the Less Healthy Choice

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      It’s no secret that marketing affects the foods we choose, including which foods we think of as more nutritious. Back in 2013, AICR wrote about how the so-called “health halo” effect can make people think organic cookies are lower in calories and all-around healthier than the exact same cookies not labeled organic.

      A new study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics finds that this effect may extend to claims about foods with added vitamins and minerals.

      For this study, researchers surveyed over 5,000 people who were selected based on age, sex, race, ethnicity, and education to mirror the U.S. population.

      Each participant who took the online survey was randomly assigned to view one package of vegetable and one package of potato chips. Chip packages varied in their health claims and in the amount of key nutrients they contained. Read more… “Study, That Nutrient Claim on Your Snack Food May Lead You to Buy the Less Healthy Choice”

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