Study: Kids’ peers may help them eat more veggies

Kid eating carrotsWhat kids think their peers are eating may matter for how many vegetables they’re eating, suggests a new study. The study was published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity and could have an impact for cancer prevention decades later. Healthy eating habits can reduce risk of kids being overweight adults, and excess body fat is a cause of ten cancers for adults.

For this small study, 143 children ages 6-11 were recruited from North-West England and brought in individually for what they thought was a study of game-playing ability.

Children were shown a participant information sheet of six fictitious previous participants that included general information as well as the amount of carrots each child ate during the session. The carrots column either read “all” (high intake group), “none” (low intake group); the column was blank or omitted in two control groups. Children were also presented with a bowl. The bowl contained one carrot in the high intake group, was nearly full of carrots in the low intake group, and was filled with pens for the control groups. Continue reading

It’s What You Eat – Not Just Where You Eat

Last Friday, a new study prompted headlines proclaiming that eating away from home and eating fast food may not link to obesity. Today, we’re hearing about a study from a scientific meeting showing that eating more homemade meals links to lower risk for type 2 diabetes.

Both obesity and type 2 diabetes link to many common cancers, including colorectal, liver and postmenopausal breast. But with seemingly contradictory take-aways, you may be left wondering – does it really matter where and what I eat?

Yes, it does!

Here’s what the researchers agree on: Continue reading

Review: Are Pictures of Food Making Us Eat More?

If you went to your favorite social media site, how many pictures of food would you see? Maybe you have even taken some of these pictures yourself! Add this to the countless cooking shows, cookbooks, and recipe blogs, and you probably see a lot of food images throughout the day.

If you’re scrolling through at a lot of fat and calorie-rich food images that look delicious – coined food porn – that might be making you eat more, especially if you are already hungry, points out a new review on the topic. Published in Brain and Cognition, the review article looks at how the many food images we see everyday may be playing a role in the current obesity epidemic.22302352_s

Obesity is linked to increased risk of ten cancers, including colorectal and liver.

While we usually think about the sense of taste when it comes to food, sight is integral to nutrition and survival. If you think back to a time when we were hunting and gathering, sight is how we foraged for food. Visual cues allowed our early ancestors to predict how safe and nutritious the food, argues the paper’s authors. Continue reading