Time to talk about alcohol

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I am in that phase of life where my age puts me at higher risk for breast cancer, and as the mother of two teenage daughters I am acutely aware of the lifestyle factors that affect their risk for breast and other cancers.

Alcohol is one factor that is giving me increasing cause for concern. From our own AICR research I know that there is strong evidence that alcohol is linked to six different cancers and this is supported by research from other authoritative bodies, such as American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and American Cancer Society (ACS).

This in itself is worrying, but what is truly alarming is the perilous rising trend in alcohol consumption and the dangers of binge drinking. This, coupled with a lack of awareness about the alcohol cancer link – over 60% of Americans in our survey were unaware – and the belief that moderate drinking may protect against heart disease – is like a ticking time bomb. Read more… “Time to talk about alcohol”

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    Study: five healthy habits lower cancer risk

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    A recent study in the U.K. found that people who followed five aspects of a healthy lifestyle were significantly less likely to be diagnosed with cancer than those who did not. Overall risk of cancer was reduced by about one-third in people who were non-smokers, had a healthy weight, were physically active, ate a healthy diet and limited alcohol within the national guidelines.

    These results are similar to AICR research which shows that in the US about one in three of the most common cancers could be prevented if everyone were at a healthy weight, maintained physical activity and ate a healthy diet. Read more… “Study: five healthy habits lower cancer risk”

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      Few American adults meet fruit and veggie goals, raising cancer risk

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      A new study covering over 300,000 adults from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that few American adults meet the 2015 Dietary Guidelines recommendations for vegetables and fruit. Nationally, about 12% of adults eat enough fruit and a little more than 9% meet the vegetable goal.

      AICR Research shows that eating a plant-based diet with plenty of vegetables and fruit can reduce risk for many cancers. The Dietary Guidelines also link a vegetable and fruit-heavy diet to a lower risk for chronic diseases like heart disease and type 2 diabetes. They recommend 1.5 – 2 cups of fruits and 2-3 cups of vegetables daily for adults.

      The CDC researchers found that women, those with higher income and adults 51 or older were more likely to eat enough vegetables. Hispanics, women and 31-50 year olds most often met the fruit goal.

      There were large differences between states, with West Virginia showing the lowest intake of vegetables (5.8%) and fruit (7.3%) and DC showing highest fruit intake (15.5%) while highest vegetable consumption was reported in Alaska (12%). You can see the statistics for your state here. Read more… “Few American adults meet fruit and veggie goals, raising cancer risk”

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