A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth

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A hormone produced by the liver called fibroblast growth factor 21, or FGF21, might play a role in curbing your sweet cravings, suggests a recent study published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

The brain and gut (which includes the liver) work together in what’s called the central reward system to control what we like and choose to eat – including sweets. Differences in that system can promote unhealthy eating habits, which can lead to obesity, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. Read more… “A liver hormone gives new clues to explain your sweet tooth”

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    Bone-derived Hormone Regulates Appetite in Mice

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    We often think of bones as static, lifeless structures, but scientists are learning that bones are far more dynamic than once believed and play important roles in immunity, kidney health, and metabolism. Now research published in Nature has identified a hormone produced by bone cells that helps regulate appetite in mice, a finding that adds to the understanding of weight management and potentially cancer risk.

    Obesity increases risk of many types of cancer.

    Scientists have long known that fat cells produce a hormone called lipocalin-2, but the researchers in this study discovered that bone-forming cells produce as much as 10 times more lipocalin-2 than fat cells. Read more… “Bone-derived Hormone Regulates Appetite in Mice”

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      Study: Yearning for Watery Fruits and Veggies after Workout

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      If you were to go running there’s a good chance you’ll be yearning for an apple instead of a doughnut afterwards, suggests a recent brain imaging study, and that may be because your brain is pushing you towards water.bigstock-Silhouette-Of-Head-With-Fruits-47793388

      Physical activity is one factor that can influence our appetite, possibly by its role in altering our brain signals related to hunger and pleasure. This study focused on bouts of a high-intensity activity: running.

      The study was small — 15 lean men — but it may help explain how exercise relates to hunger and overall health. It was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

      In the study, the men first ran for an hour and then at a later day, they rested for an hour. For each trial, the men had easy access to water.

      Ten minutes after they ran or rested, researchers scanned specific areas of the men’s brain as they looked at two dozen food images. In random order, they saw images of high-calorie foods — such as brownies, ice cream, pizza and fried chicken — and low calorie foods, including grapes, apples, lettuce, and carrots. (They also saw two dozen images of non-food items.) Read more… “Study: Yearning for Watery Fruits and Veggies after Workout”

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