Our Meeting Menu: Inspiration for Your Holiday Parties

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We, at AICR know how tough it is to follow our recommendations on the road – whether for vacation or work related conferences. At our research conference last week we want our attendees to be able to live the message, so we work hard to make sure they get delicious, beautiful and cancer-fighting meals.

Black Bean & Barley Salad for Day 2 lunch
Black Bean & Barley Salad for Day 2 lunch

Months before the conference we begin working closely with the hotel chef talking about our recommendations, recipes and research-based New American Plate. The chef had no trouble embracing our basic food guidelines:

  • Eat more of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes such as beans.
  • Limit the amount of red meats (such as beef, pork and lamb) you eat and avoid processed meats.
  • Limit consumption of salty foods and foods processed with salt (sodium).
Mini-tarts. Flavor-filled small bites.
Flavor-filled chocolate and lemon mini-tarts.

Our specifications also include vegetarian options, modest portions of whole grains, and light and small desserts. Read more… “Our Meeting Menu: Inspiration for Your Holiday Parties”

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    What’s Your Nutrition Literacy?

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    Health literacy is important to taking care of your health, and nutrition literacy is vital to choosing healthy foods for cancer prevention. But it’s not just a matter of reading comprehension, according to the author of a study presented as a poster at our research conference yesterday.

    Try these:

    1.Gibbs.NLitBCa.AICR-1.docx

    2. If calories are equal for one serving of each food, which provides the most healthful nutrients overall?

    A. Applesauce with no sugar added

    B. an appleGibbs.NLitBCa.AICRNU

    C. applesauce with no sugar added is about equal to an apple in nutrition

    3.. If you are trying to eat fewer than 500 mg of sodium per meal, how many cups of this food (Nutrition label) can you eat if you eat nothing else at the meal?

    A. 1 cup

    B. 2 cups

    C. 3 cups

    D. 4 cups

     

     

     

     

     

    Those were three of the questions used by Heather Gibbs, PhD, at the University of Kansas Medical Center. “Literacy is a functional skill, so nutrition literacy is different than health literacy because we’re also looking at what knowledge and skills are needed in order for people to choose a healthy diet,” said Gibbs.

    The three arms of her study included a group of 25 survivors who were currently in a weight-loss program; another group of 30 who were not in a program; and 17 women who were at high risk for the disease but not survivors.

    Gibbs remembered one participant who read a question about finding a point of information on a Nutrition Facts label. “She read the question out loud perfectly,” Gibbs says. “But she didn’t understand how to find the answer on the label.”

    Other skills Gibbs cites are evaluating fresh foods for quality, such as how much meat was marbled with fat or what colors of vegetables indicated. Participants were also asked whether they used the information on the front of labels, where marketing terms like “natural” or “organic” might make them assume a product is healthy for them; or what information they looked for if they were trying to manage their weight.

    The hope is to develop a tool to help dietitians use their time educating people about the things they don’t know about or understand, says Gibbs.

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      Getting the Diet “Just Right” – Vitamins, Minerals and the Goldilocks Effect

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      Joel Mason, MD of Tufts University Medical Center kicked off the opening plenary session of the 2014 AICR Research Conference with a deep dive into one of the most intriguing and – to the public, at least – confusing and even frustrating areas of cancer prevention research.canstockphoto3912708

      As scientists learn more about the interplay between diet and cancer risk, it’s clearer than ever that the role of many dietary factors in several cancers is more complex than was once thought.

      The entire plenary session of our research conference is focusing on the notion of the “Goldilocks Effect”– the idea that, for several dietary factors, the old idea of “more is better” is flatly wrong. (In scientific circles, this phenomenon is known as the “U-shaped curve,” which describes the graph of dose-response observed as consumption of a given dietary factor increases – from high risk (low consumption) to lower risk (adequate consumption) and back to high risk (high consumption).

      Mason spoke on folate as a case in point: Habitually low consumption of folate is associated with higher risk for colorectal and other cancers, as low folate levels increase genomic instability in cells. But in some cases, getting too much folate in the diet has also been linked, in animal models and in some human studies, to increased risk. He stressed, however, that this finding remains controversial, as the evidence for a risk-increasing effect for folate is by no means as consistent as the evidence for its protective role. But until we learn more, he advised that the general population stick to the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation to limit folic acid intake to less than 1000 mcgs/day. Read more… “Getting the Diet “Just Right” – Vitamins, Minerals and the Goldilocks Effect”

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