Speak Up Now: Voice Your Interests for the New Dietary Guidelines

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Me giving oral testimony. Click for full video.

Earlier this week, 70+ people – representing interests such as meat, dairy, public health, sugar, vegetarian, spices and sustainability – gathered at the National Institutes of Health to weigh in on what the 2015 Dietary Guidelines should say to Americans about a healthy diet.

I had the opportunity to represent AICR and speak up for guidance that will help Americans more easily make choices to lower their cancer risk. Everyone had 3 minutes to speak directly to experts from USDA and Health and Human Services who will be writing the 2015 dietary guidelines for Americans. You can watch the video here. The Dietary Guidelines (revised every 5 years) are key to how we move forward with dietary advice, and that also affects how food is produced and manufactured in the U.S. Continue reading


Added Sugars: Soda versus Food

Added sugar is making a lot of news lately. Last week, I wrote about the FDA’s proposed new Nutrition Facts label that would show how much sugar is added to foods. This week, the World Health Organization (WHO) released their new recommendation for an upper limit on how much added sugar we eat. They now say that no more than 5% of total daily calories should come from added sugars – about 100 calories, or 25 grams of sugar – for an adult.

Twenty-five grams of added sugar is not much. Check out the table below to see two ways you’d reach that daily limit – one way is pure sugar, another includes foods with cancer fighting compounds.

A sugary soda (8-ounces) vs. 4 delicious, healthful foods
Bottle of soda isolated on white background. Clipping Path
25 grams
=
Healthy breakfast
6 grams
Vanilla yogurt over strawberries banana and blueberries isolated on white.
11 grams
Raspberry jam dripping from a spoon isolated on white background
3 grams
Delicious chocolates closeup on white background
5 grams

Added sugar is a concern, especially in sugary beverages, because it contributes to overweight and obesity which is linked to 7 cancers, including colorectal, postmenopausal and endometrial.

For those interested, WHO is accepting public comments on this recommendation.