Study: Male Cancer Survivors Who are Active Live Longer

Research already shows that being active can reduce the risk of developing several cancers. Now comes a study that suggests for men, taking that brisk daily walk after a cancer diagnosis may lengthen your life.bigstock-Walking-2525305

The study was published in the Journal of Physical Activity and Health, and it adds to a growing body of research suggesting that exercise can have significant health benefits for cancer survivors.

“The main take away message is that physical activity improves survival in men with cancer, says I-Min Lee, MD, ScD, an epidemiologist at the  Harvard School of Public Health and lead author of the study.

”There have been previous studies, examining survival in breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer patients, showing similar findings.  Our study included not only survivors of these cancers, but of other cancers “

For the study, Lee and her colleagues looked at data collected in 1988 from a group of about 1,000 male cancer survivors. On average the men had been diagnosed six years previously – in 1982. In 1988 the men reported on their activity habits.  They also answered questions about their weight, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, and what foods they ate. The data was updated five years later. Continue reading


Study: Yearning for Watery Fruits and Veggies after Workout

If you were to go running there’s a good chance you’ll be yearning for an apple instead of a doughnut afterwards, suggests a recent brain imaging study, and that may be because your brain is pushing you towards water.bigstock-Silhouette-Of-Head-With-Fruits-47793388

Physical activity is one factor that can influence our appetite, possibly by its role in altering our brain signals related to hunger and pleasure. This study focused on bouts of a high-intensity activity: running.

The study was small — 15 lean men — but it may help explain how exercise relates to hunger and overall health. It was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

In the study, the men first ran for an hour and then at a later day, they rested for an hour. For each trial, the men had easy access to water.

Ten minutes after they ran or rested, researchers scanned specific areas of the men’s brain as they looked at two dozen food images. In random order, they saw images of high-calorie foods — such as brownies, ice cream, pizza and fried chicken — and low calorie foods, including grapes, apples, lettuce, and carrots. (They also saw two dozen images of non-food items.) Continue reading


Report: Half of Cancer Deaths are Preventable

Almost one of every two people born today will develop cancer, but more than half of all cancer deaths are preventable, according to a major report released today on the state of cancer progress.AICR_trefoil

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) report estimates that 580,350 Americans will die from cancer this year. More than half of these cancer deaths link to preventable causes, including smoking, obesity, poor diet, drinking alcohol, inactivity, and sun exposure.

This report’s section on preventability aligns with AICR findings that lifestyle matters when it comes to lowering cancer risk.

Decades of funding and analyzing the research on diet, body fat, and physical activity have led to some clear conclusions on cancer prevention and survivorship. AICR estimates that staying a healthy weight, eating a healthy diet, and daily activity can prevent over a third of US cancer cases. Continue reading