Bravo and Farewell, Doty!

Fruits and veggiesAll of us at AICR were saddened to hear that Cartoonist Roy Doty – a fixture in the cartooning world since the 1960s – died earlier this month. Since the 1980s, Doty (who never wanted to be called “Roy”) illustrated AICR’s good-news-letter and, more recently, the World Cancer Research Fund’s Great Grub Club newsletter to teach children about healthy eating and physical activity for cancer prevention.

Doty’s heartfelt support of AICR’s cancer prevention message to eat more plant foods inspired his fruit and vegetable characters Hedda Broccoli, Lois Lemon and Peter Pepper, as well as the humorous Professor Foodsmart and his dog Snack. His fHedda Brocriendly art helped donors relate to AICR and reached children with fun yet educational scenarios, puzzles, games.

Doty was a beloved and ever-imaginative friend to AICR whose instantly recognizable style and imagination earned him many awards from the National Cartoonists Society and a place among the best-known cartoonists. Continue reading


Speak Up Now: Voice Your Interests for the New Dietary Guidelines

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Me giving oral testimony. Click for full video.

Earlier this week, 70+ people – representing interests such as meat, dairy, public health, sugar, vegetarian, spices and sustainability – gathered at the National Institutes of Health to weigh in on what the 2015 Dietary Guidelines should say to Americans about a healthy diet.

I had the opportunity to represent AICR and speak up for guidance that will help Americans more easily make choices to lower their cancer risk. Everyone had 3 minutes to speak directly to experts from USDA and Health and Human Services who will be writing the 2015 dietary guidelines for Americans. You can watch the video here. The Dietary Guidelines (revised every 5 years) are key to how we move forward with dietary advice, and that also affects how food is produced and manufactured in the U.S. Continue reading


Three drinks a day can cause liver cancer, new report finds

An analysis of worldwide research on diet, weight, physical activity and liver cancer has found strong evidence that consuming approximately three or more alcoholic drinks a day causes liver cancer. Published today, the finding provides the clearest indication so far of how many drinks actually cause liver cancer.r-uauy

As a member of the independent panel of scientists that reviewed the worldwide research, this is a significant finding that I hope will help reduce the global number of cases of liver cancer. Currently, it’s the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide, accounting for 746,000 deaths globally in 2012.

How alcohol causes liver cancer

Excessive alcohol consumption over a period of time can cause damage to the liver and lead to cirrhosis (scarring and hardening of the liver), which is known to increase the risk of this cancer. We know that 90-95% of liver cancer cases have underlying cirrhosis. Alcohol consumption is also carcinogenic to humans, has tumor-promoting effects, and is associated with increased body fat. The latter is a concern because obesity is a risk factor for accumulation of fat in the liver, which may lead to cirrhosis and also increase liver cancer risk. Continue reading