Lose weight slow and steady – keep it off years later

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If you’ve worked to lose weight, you may have found it just as challenging to keep it off months and years later. And there aren’t a lot of clear answers on how to avoid pounds creeping back on. But we do know that staying a healthy weight is one of the most important lifestyle factors you can do to reduce risk of many cancers, including postmenopausal breast, colorectal and esophageal.

Now, a recent study, published in Obesity, finds that slow and steady weight loss may be best. Taking that approach, even in the first few weeks of a program, may predict your ability to maintain that weight loss even up to 2 years later. Research has been mixed on whether consistency in weight loss and diet affects ability to keep weight off longer term. In this study, researchers compared those with steady weight loss to those with weight fluctuations in the first 6-12 weeks of the study to see how that affected their long term ability to maintain weight loss.

The scientists assigned 183 people to one of three groups with different diets. They met weekly for 6 months, then less often the rest of the year. Those who lost a consistent amount of weight week to week had low variability, and those who lost, for example, 5 pounds one week and then gained 3 and lost several again, had high weight variability. Read more… “Lose weight slow and steady – keep it off years later”

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    New state rankings for adult obesity leveling but still high, placing many at increased cancer risk

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    A new report out today shows US adult obesity rates leveling off, yet still at least one of every four adults has obesity in almost every state. That’s a big deal for cancer risk because AICR research links obesity to eleven cancers. Aside from not smoking, getting to and staying a healthy weight is the single biggest change people can do to lower their cancer risk.

    The new findings are from the 14th annual State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America and the positive news is that obesity rates appear to be stabilizing overall. That’s a marked change from the steady growth throughout the 2000s. Last year was the first time the annual report found declines in adult obesity rates and, overtime, growth has started to slow. Read more… “New state rankings for adult obesity leveling but still high, placing many at increased cancer risk”

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      HealthTalk: Are potatoes bad for you?

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      Q: Are potatoes bad for you? I read that eating too many is unhealthy.

      A: It can be confusing to make sense of how potatoes fit in healthy eating habits. Some sources talk about potatoes as loaded with nutrients, yet others say potatoes don’t even count toward goals of eating more vegetables. Here’s the scoop….

      Nutrients, Calories and Phytochemicals – A medium potato is rich in vitamin C and offers even more blood-pressure-friendly potassium than two medium bananas. Potatoes provide other protective nutrients, including the phytochemical quercetin and dietary fiber (particularly with the skin on).

      Along with corn, peas and lima beans, potatoes are categorized as a starchy vegetable. Each serving has more carbohydrate and calories than non-starchy vegetables like broccoli, lettuce or tomatoes, making some people think potatoes are high-calorie.

      Read more… “HealthTalk: Are potatoes bad for you?”

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