It’s not that confusing. Diet and exercise matter for cancer prevention.

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Not smoking will lower your risk of many cancers. Getting vaccinated will lower your risk of certain cancers. And eating a healthy diet along with exercising regularly will also lower your risk of certain cancers.

It’s not that confusing.

If you read a widely shared New York Times piece going around this week, you would think that you shouldn’t trust any evidence when it comes to diet and exercise and cancer risk. That’s not true.

It’s not a single study, or even several. It’s looking at the entire body of research, systematically and thoroughly – what we do here at AICR – and what that shows is:

The foods you eat will lower your risk because staying a healthy weight is so important for cancer prevention.

-Getting at least 30 minutes of moderate activity a day reduces the risk of breast, endometrial and colorectal cancers. Emerging research suggests possibly more.

Read more… “It’s not that confusing. Diet and exercise matter for cancer prevention.”

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    Frequent weighing, small changes, can help young adults avoid that creeping weight gain

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    Weight gain tends to creep up on us: studies show that young adults typically gain about a pound and half a year. This might not be noticeable from year to year, but over decades it can add up to significant extra weight if it goes unchecked. Gaining weight can be particularly harmful for young adults, perhaps because it’s tough to lose weight, meaning these individuals live with excess body fat for longer. Excess body fat is linked to many types of cancer and other chronic diseases.

    The good news is that young adults may not need dramatic changes to diet and exercise to prevent weight gain, as a study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests. This randomized clinical trial followed nearly 600 young adults ages 18-35 for an average of three years. About half of the participants had BMIs within the normal range, while the other half were already overweight or obese. The study compared two approaches—small, daily changes to diet and physical activity vs. more dramatic diet and exercise changes—to a control group.

    Both intervention groups started with ten in-person meetings, while the control group had only one in-person meeting to provide an overview of the study and the issue of weight gain. Read more… “Frequent weighing, small changes, can help young adults avoid that creeping weight gain”

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      Chill Out With A Green Tea Mint Cooler

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      Thank goodness for air conditioning and iced tea. I could not get though this summer’s sizzling, lingering heat without them.

      Happily, my work lets me be indoors most of the time. Being comfortably air-conditioned, it’s an effort drinking enough to stay hydrated because I forget that when air conditioning pulls out moisture, it dehumidifies me as well as the air. Since drinking water bores me, this means creating enough variety to keep drinking, both indoors and when outside, and without adding too many calories. Read more… “Chill Out With A Green Tea Mint Cooler”

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