Pass the Pumpkin: Three Other Fall Healthy Favorites

Though pumpkin has begun to take over the fall scene, there are many other fruits and vegetables to enjoy this time of year – all toting cancer protective nutrients. From apples to zucchini, here are three new ways to enjoy some familiar Autumn fruits and veggies.canstockphoto20734490

Zucchini Fries: Instead of the usual roasted vegetable, give zucchini fries a try. They’re a great alternative to traditional fries and offer less calories and lots of flavor.

Making zucchini fries can be a bit of a tedious process, but the end result is well worth it.

To make “fries,” leave on the skin and cut the zucchini in half width-wise. Then cut it into quarter-inch “planks” length-wise. Dredge the fries in egg white, flour, and a mix of breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese. You can substitute breadcrumbs for Panko crumbs for extra crispiness. Bake your fries at 400 degrees until they are golden brown and crispy on the outside. Serve warm with your favorite dipping sauce or plain. Your family will definitely ask for these again.

Mashing rutabaga and turnips: Both rutabagas and turnips offer a natural sweetness and are lighter than mashed potatoes, making a perfect mashed potato substitute for something different. Continue reading


AICR Welcomes Oncology Group’s New Position on Obesity

obesity-and-cancerToday, in a bold position paper published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, the American Society of Clinical Oncology alerted its members and the public to the clear and convincing link between obesity and cancer, and outlined a strategy for combating obesity that will help reduce cancer incidence in the years ahead.

“Obesity is a major, under-recognized contributor to the nation’s cancer toll and is quickly overtaking tobacco as the leading preventable cause of cancer,” reads the JCO paper.

We at AICR strongly agree, and officially welcome today’s development as important progress in much-needed prevention efforts that could save millions of American lives in the years ahead.

The reason this JCO position paper is so important is because oncologists stand on the front lines of our national battle against cancer, and are uniquely positioned to counsel patients about weight management.

The paper goes on to outline a series of new ASCO initiatives to:

1) increase education and awareness of the obesity-cancer link;

2) provide tools to help oncologist address obesity with their patients;

3) foster research to better understand how to best help their patients manage their weight, and;

4) advocate for policy to make the kind of societal changes that will make it easier for patients to manage their weight.

AICR is delighted to have ASCO officially weighing in on this vital area, and we are excited to offer any help we can. We’ve established the evidence base that shows that obesity increases the risk for eight different cancers. In the coming months and years, our ongoing analysis will likely find even more. In the meantime, we’ve developed interactive tools, brochures and infographics to raise awareness about the obesity-cancer link, and evidence-based advice for individuals on how to lose weight and lower their risk.

But the statistics are stark, and they challenge before us is great. It will take all of us working together to combat obesity and the chronic diseases that follow on from it. We are grateful to have an old ally officially declare itself and join us in the fight.


Study: Social Network Sharing Helps Weight Loss

If you’re like 75 percent of American adults who are online, you’re already using social network sites like Facebook, and you may be using other online tools to track activities. Now a new analysis of current evidence suggests that doctors and other providers using similar tools may help patients stay in touch, stay on target and stay in shape.Happy Seniors Couple With Tablet Pc In The Park

Diverse and innovative approaches that help people achieve a healthier weight could lead to thousands of fewer cases of cancer every year in the U.S. because excess body fat increases risk for 8 cancers, including those of the colorectum and breast (postmenopausal).

Published in the September issue of the journal Health Affairs, the researchers conducted an analysis of 12 studies to determine whether online social networking between health care providers and their overweight and obese patients can help with weight loss. Continue reading