Making it Easier for Kids to Eat Whole Grains

Research shows many reasons why it’s important for kids to eat a diet rich in whole grains. Whole grains can help your kids – and you – maintain a healthy weight. And as your kids become older, whole grains can help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart diseases, and diet-related cancers.Wheat ears in the child hands

Recent research that I have collaborated on through the CHANGE Study suggests that children who ate more than 1.5 servings of whole grains every day had a 40 percent less risk of being obese than children who did not consume whole grains.

Yet only about 5 percent of American adults and children eat the recommended servings of whole grains every day and not all whole-grain products are good or excellent sources of dietary fiber. There are a lot of positive developments in what food companies and others to help kids get more whole grains. But there is still more progress that we can make in three main settings.

Marketplace: Changes made by food companies that have reformulated ready-to-eat breakfast cereal products, combined with new school nutrition policies and healthier meals served at home, will collectively make it easier for children to consume the recommended three servings of whole grains every day. Continue reading


Halving Cancer Death with AICR Recommendations for Prevention

Eating mostly fruits, vegetables and other plant foods, staying a healthy weight and exercising are among AICR’s recommendations shown to reduce the risk of developing cancer.

Holding HandsNow a new study suggests that healthy people who follow at least five of AICR’s Recommendations have a lower risk of dying from cancer by more than half compared to those who don’t follow any. And the lower risk was seen with meeting just one recommendation, getting lower for each additional recommendation followed.

The study was published in the February issue of Cancer Causes & Control.

“We found that meeting the AICR recommendations for body weight, diet, and physical activity is associated with lower cancer mortality,” says lead author Theresa Hastert, an epidemiologist at University of Michigan School of Public Health who conducted the study while at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. “Although the benefits are greatest for people who meet the most recommendations, even meeting one or two can be protective.” Continue reading


A Go-To Meatloaf

terrific-turkey-meatloafCraving a hearty dish to ward off the January blues? Rely on our Health-e-Recipe for Terrific Turkey Meatloaf for a tasty and healthy version of this favorite comfort food.

Onion and mushrooms sautéed in olive oil add cancer-preventive phytochemicals and fiber to ground turkey, a healthier choice of animal protein than ground beef (especially the leanest 7% fat kind). Worcester sauce and thyme season the meat, then egg and breadcrumbs create the perfect texture. Tomato paste and ketchup add lycopene, a phytochemical that research shows may help to prevent prostate cancer.

For only 238 calories and 6 grams of fat per serving, you get a substantial 30 grams of protein. This yummy entrée goes beautifully with mashed sweet potatoes and a steamed leafy garlicky greens. Round out your plate (and fit the New American Plate model) with a whole-grain roll, and you’ll be ready for whatever winter weather challenges that come your way!

For more delicious cancer-fighting recipes, visit the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.