Diet Plays a Role in Colon Cancer Reccurence: New Study

It was only in the past few decades that research found diet plays a role in preventing colon cancer. Now, a study suggests that colon cancer patients whose diets are relatively low in starchy foods and carbohydrates have a lower risk of recurrence and death compared to those eating a high carb diet.

The findings were published online yesterday in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The study builds on the authors’ earlier research that observed a link between an overall pattern of eating and recurrence among colon cancer patients. That study found patients who ate the most fats, meats, carbs and sugary desserts — a Western diet — were three times more likely to have their cancer recur compared to those whose diets were least Western.

The current study focused on teasing apart which part of the Western diet might most contribute to the effect. Continue reading


Hear AICR’s Registered Dietitian Discuss Major Advances in Diet-Cancer Research

Our article on 9 Findings That Have Rocked Cancer Prevention Research in this month’s issue of Cancer Research Update inspired the website Wellness Times to interview AICR’s Alice Bender, MS, RD on the subject.

Listen to Alice discuss the major scientific advances that have transformed our understanding of how everyday choices influence our cancer risk.

Are you receiving Cancer Research Update, AICR’s free biweekly digest of breaking news and cutting-edge research on the role of diet, weight, physical activity on cancer? Stay up on the science by subscribing today.


Moving Research for Cancer Survivors Day

I’ve been listening to a lot of research about exercise here at the American College of Sports Medicine conference and for cancer survivors, the evidence is heartening: activity may help survivors’ health.

One of the latest major published studies mentioned here links physical activity to a longer life among breast and colon cancer patients. Exercise may also lengthen the life of other cancer survivors, but the evidence for that is not as clear, the study concluded.

The analysis comes ahead of the 25th annual National Cancer Survivors Day, which is this Sunday. It was published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The authors looked at all relevant studies published from 1950 to 2011, ending up with a total of 45 articles. The studies focused on physical activity, and cancer survival and/or biological indicators – biomarkers – of survival. Continue reading