AICR’s Cancer Research Update: The Special Edition

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AA045219Every issue of AICR’s biweekly e-publication, Cancer Research Update, delivers exactly what its title promises: Quick summaries of the latest research on diet, physical activity, weight and cancer, delivered straight to your inbox.

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The latest issue of CRU is a special edition: We present highlights from last week’s AICR Research Conference on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer – including the study that won top honors at our poster session.

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    From the Poster Session: Meet the AICR Grantees

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    Several AICR-funded researchers came to our conference last week to present their latest findings in the poster session:

    Dr. Emmanuel T. Akporiaye of the Robert W. Franz Cancer Research Center in Portland, Oregon, updated us on the progress of his grant examining the effect of a derivative of vitamin E on breast cancer tumors. (Earlier this year, we profiled Dr. A in AICR’s biweekly e-newsletter Cancer Research Update.  A longer version of that interview appeared in this Summer’s AICR ScienceNow newsletter.)

    AICR Grantee Emmanuel Akporiaye Dr. Nameer B. Kirma of the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio presented data from his work with soy components and breast cancer.
    AICR Grantee Nameer Kirma

    Dr. Meghan M. Mensack is using an AICR grant at the Colorado State University to study the anti-cancer potential of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L)

    AICR Grantee Meghan Mensack

    Lots more AICR-funded scientists, after the jump.

    Read more… “From the Poster Session: Meet the AICR Grantees”

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      Dr. Kathryn Schmitz on Physical Activity, Lymphedema and Cancer Survivors

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      YouTube Preview ImageAt our Research Conference last week, we were honored to have Kathryn H. Schmitz, PhD, MPH, FACSM give a talk on strategies for promoting physical activity among cancer survivors.

      It was Dr. Schmitz’s PAL (Physical Activity and Lymphedema) Trial that showed that survivors with lymphedema (swelling of the limbs) could benefit from gradual, closely supervised weight training – a finding that challenged the conventional wisdom that lymphedema sufferers should avoid weight-bearing exercise.  She published her findings in the August issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.  We profiled this research in the latest issue of AICR’s ScienceNow newsletter.

      But that doesn’t mean that women who have, or who are at high risk for lymphedema, should just head to the gym and start lifting away.  We caught up with Dr. Schmitz at lunch, and she talked about two online resources to help these women get the guidance they need.

      www.lymphnet.org – The National Lymphedema Network. Find physical therapists trained in lymphedema issues.

      www.strengthandcourage.net – Order a DVD on exercise after breast cancer surgery – includes many of the exercises used in Dr. Schmitz’s PAL trial.

      For more general advice about diet and physical activity during and after cancer, don’t forget to check out the AICR/New York Presbyterian Hospital DVD, Food For the Fight: Guidelines for Healthy Nutrition During and After Cancer Treatment

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