Being positive: Is it a benefit or a burden?

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Being diagnosed with cancer is a traumatic event. Indeed, some estimates say that 1 in 4 women diagnosed with breast cancer suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder as a direct result of their diagnosis. The number may be even higher for diagnoses with other types of cancer. Despite the acknowledged trauma of a diagnosis, most if not all cancer survivor will have been told, at some point or other, to “stay positive”! Such advice is certainly well-intentioned. There is a strong and enduring belief that maintaining a positive outlook actually improves patient outcomes. However, the scientific evidence is now very clear; attitude and personality traits do not significantly impact recurrence or survival rates.

Read more… “Being positive: Is it a benefit or a burden?”

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    Keeping your gut healthy during and after cancer treatment

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    March is National Nutrition Month so AICR’s blog today focuses on proper dietary care for digestive concerns during cancer treatment and rehabilitation. Patients and survivors experience digestive issues during and after treatment for many types of cancer due. Here, Angela Hummel offers food and nutrition tips and advice on managing digestive side effects due to the disease and treatment.  Hummel is a specialist in oncology nutrition and is a consulting dietitian with AICR. Read more… “Keeping your gut healthy during and after cancer treatment”

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      How I help myself reduce the risk of another recurrence

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      I never thought I’d be in this position.  Fourteen years in, and I continue to have chronic breast cancer. I’m much better now and stronger than I was when my journey first began, yet I still see my oncologist for a maintenance dose of a targeted chemotherapy every three weeks.

      I’ve built my new life around my breast cancer to keep moving forward. One of the best things I’ve learned is to never look back at what might have been. I try to live in the moment and I know that I can only control certain aspects of the future.

      In addition to my maintenance chemo, I spend a lot of my week taking care of myself and doing what I can to improve my health and prevent another recurrence. I eat a healthy diet, exercise almost every day, get enough sleep, and try to live mindfully and as stress-free as I can manage, given the nature of my medical history. Read more… “How I help myself reduce the risk of another recurrence”

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