Nothing to Lose, Everything to Gain: One Survivor’s Story

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Lisa

As a specialist in oncology nutrition, I am passionate about helping people meet the many challenges of managing their diet as best they can throughout their cancer treatment.  This work has inspired me to help people put cancer prevention into action through my work with AICR and the New American Plate Challenge, online weight loss program launching this week.

Over the past 9 months, participants have shared many reasons why they’ve signed up – to lose weight, improve their health and just feel better. I spoke with one woman, Lisa, a mother and a breast cancer survivor who participated in the challenge while completing her cancer treatment.

After her diagnosis, she had been trying to lose weight, with the guidance of a nutritionist, with no success.  She had been looking on the AICR website for recipes and came across the NAP Challenge.  “I realized that I had nothing to lose and everything to gain due to my unexpected cancer diagnosis.” Continue reading


6 Habits for Restaurant Dining and Lower Cancer Risk

In the U.S. we eat about one-third of our food away from home – including both fast food and full service restaurants. A study published this week in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that you may be getting almost an entire day’s worth of calories in one sit-down restaurant meal.bigstock-Eat-healthy-with-this-menu-of--35851439

The researchers looked at the nutritional value of meals at 21 full-service restaurant chains and found that, on average, a single meal (entrée, side and one-half appetizer) contains almost 1500 calories, 28 grams saturated fat and 3300 milligrams sodium. Add a shared dessert and a beverage and the calories jump to over 2000.

Eating this way regularly can lead to overweight and obesity – and increased risk for several cancers, including colorectal, post-menopausal breast and pancreatic cancer. Continue reading


Top Diet Rankings (Cancer Prevention Missing)

NAP-Plate-v02Healthy — and not so healthy — diets are in the news today, with US News releasing their best-diet rankings.

Among the 32 diets evaluated, the DASH diet ranked best overall. It also tied for top spot in diabetes control. With it’s full name — Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension — you can probably tell that it was originally developed to control blood pressure. Paleo diet ranked at the bottom.

US News experts focused on eight categories, including the best diet for weight loss, diabetes, and heart-health. But they did not focus on the best diet for cancer prevention. (Maybe next year!) Continue reading