A Tasty Fish Dish for Cancer Prevention Month

tilapia croppedOur Health-e-Recipe for Broiled Tilapia with Mustard and Yogurt Sauce puts fish on your plate as part of National Cancer Prevention Month.

Eating fish is one way to cut back on red meat; AICR recommends eating no more than 18 ounces of red meat a week for lower risk of cancer.

Some fish are high in omega-3 fatty acids, especially salmon, white albacore tuna, trout and sardines. Although tilapia is not up there with the top omega-3 providers, it’s easy on a budget and versatile to many flavors.

This recipe is easy to prepare and has only 200 calories per serving. Yet each serving also contains a generous 34 grams of protein, about one-third the amount recommended daily for strong bones.

The sauce of lemon, mustard, Greek yogurt and chives works well with other kinds of fish, too – such as salmon, perch and flounder. For a guide to making smart seafood choices, visit The Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch.

Find more delicious cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Pizza for Cancer Prevention? Mining Twitter for Popular Nutrition and Cancer Myths

I am not a cancer expert.canstockphoto6433880

So when I want to get a sense of the state of research related to nutrition and cancer I turn to resources like the AICR. But many people don’t know about such resources, and this is reflected in cancer knowledge. For instance, the AICR’s own survey found that 42% of Americans don’t think that a healthy diet can reduce cancer risk, and fewer are aware of associations with specific foods such as processed meat.

What resources are people visiting, and what are they talking about? One way to get a glimpse of this is to mine Twitter, which I did for the last couple weeks, collecting about 420,000 tweets containing the word “cancer”. From these, I used the list of terms and their derivatives from this AICR/WCRF report, along with other health related terms that I came up with (82 in total) to assemble a list of 14,585 tweets for analysis of the links being posted. Continue reading


World Cancer Day: Connecting Global Action to Personal Stories

Since 2000, World Cancer Day has been an annual occasion for us to reflect on current progress and future action needed for cancer prevention, detection and treatment. World Cancer Day 2014 statistics show that people who engage in risky but modifiable lifestyle Vivica Kraak_Deakin photo_2013behaviors — smoking, unhealthy alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and a poor diet — will be among the 25 million new annual cases.

Each one of these new cancer cases and cancer deaths has a personal story attached to it. Here is why this year’s World Cancer Day has special relevance and how cancer has affected my life.

In May 2013, representatives of 194 countries at the 66th World Health Assembly in Geneva approved a landmark resolution to reduce non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 25 percent by 2025. NCDs, which include cancers, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes, are illnesses that are non-infectious, chronic and slow to progress.

The World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) Global Action Plan 2013-2020 encourages collaborative partnerships among government agencies, public-interest groups and the private sector to reach this ambitious outcome. Country representatives committed to track and report their progress — using 9 goals and 25 indicators — to create healthy food environments, promote physical activity and strengthen health systems. Continue reading