More Fun Summer Book Recommendations, Health Related

In today’s Cancer Research Update, we have nine great book recommendations – all health related. But we had so many suggestions they all didn’t make the list.

Here’s a few more recommendations, from the professionals that couldn’t choose only one and from AICR staff. Thanks to all. And if you have a health-related book, please share.Apple on pile of books on grass. Education concept, back to scho

Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach
This book goes into how our digestion system works, from our saliva to gut bacteria. She’s an entertaining writer; she wrote a book called Stiff on cadavers, which is a fun read too.

Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen
 by Christopher McDougall
The author tells the story of an isolated tribe’s great distance runners, who can run hundreds of miles without rest. This book will motivate any one at any fitness level to get out and run – you can’t help but be inspired by this story.

The Heart of the Plate: Vegetarian Recipes for a New Generation by Mollie Katzen
The author of The Moosewood Cookbook, Mollie again provides recipes that help you take plant-focused eating from a “should” because it’s healthy to something so enjoyable, you are delighted to make vegetable-focused dishes the main focus of a meal. As a bonus, she includes a short section on stocking the kitchen with ingredients and tools that make healthful cooking easier.

Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation by Michael Pollan
This is a book on the history and culture of cookery. It discusses cooking methods and the science behind food. After reading this, if you’ve lost your way from cooking real whole foods at home, you’ll find yourself back in the kitchen! If not, you’ll increase your culinary mastery. Continue reading


Weight Loss, Cancer Prevention and Health: Why Vegetables and Fruits Matter

If you’ve been working hard to eat more broccoli or blueberries, headlines like “Fruits and vegetables don’t lead to weight loss, study says” can drive you crazy. You may wonder if it’s worth the effort. I certainly hear from people questioning whether they can trust any nutrition and weight loss messages when they see headlines like these.NAP-Plate-v02

Make no mistake about it, fruits and vegetables are a key part of a cancer-preventive diet. And they can play a role in getting to and staying a healthy weight – important for lowering risk for eight cancers and other chronic diseases. Even the authors of that recent study acknowledge that in their paper. So why the confusing messages?

Here’s what that study was about: The authors say that health organizations promote increasing veggies and fruit for weight loss without explaining the need to also decrease overall calories. So they looked for studies that tested the idea that simply adding vegetables and fruit to your diet will lead to weight loss. Continue reading


Report: Teens Getting too Much Screen Time

About three of every four adolescents are in front of the TV and the computer beyond what is recommended, with youths who are overweight in front of screens more than their healthy weight peers, according to a new government report.

The National Center for Health Statistics report focused on how much screen time 12 to 15 year olds were getting outside of school, citing high screen times’ link with high blood pressure, cholesterol, and being overweight.

For cancer prevention, AICR recommends limiting sedentary activities. Long amounts of time sitting – such as watching TV – links to overweight and obesity, a cause of eight types of cancers. We wrote about the latest research linking inactivity and cancer risk last month.

ScreenTime

Continue reading