Study: five healthy habits lower cancer risk

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A recent study in the U.K. found that people who followed five aspects of a healthy lifestyle were significantly less likely to be diagnosed with cancer than those who did not. Overall risk of cancer was reduced by about one-third in people who were non-smokers, had a healthy weight, were physically active, ate a healthy diet and limited alcohol within the national guidelines.

These results are similar to AICR research which shows that in the US about one in three of the most common cancers could be prevented if everyone were at a healthy weight, maintained physical activity and ate a healthy diet. Read more… “Study: five healthy habits lower cancer risk”

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    Coffee links to lower risk of cancer and early death says new analysis

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    That daily cup – or more – of coffee may boost your health by reducing your risk of several types of cancer, heart disease and even early death, says a new review of the evidence. This matters because even a small benefit from coffee could significantly impact Americans’ health with over 60% of US adults drinking coffee daily, according to a National Coffee Association survey.

    AICR’s research shows that drinking coffee reduces risk for endometrial and liver cancer. Coffee contains a variety of compounds that can block carcinogens, reduce cancer cell growth and promote cancer cell death.

    In the study published last month in the British Medical Journal, researchers conducted an umbrella review that included 201 meta-analyses looking at coffee’s effect on several health outcomes in different populations around the world. Health outcomes included cancer, cardiovascular disease, and early death from all causes.  Read more… “Coffee links to lower risk of cancer and early death says new analysis”

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      HealthTalk: Is eating a late dinner hurting my health?

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      Q: I don’t get home until late. Is eating a late dinner hurting my health?

      A: Emerging research suggests that eating too late in the evening may lead to weight gain and increased health risks. So far, the studies raising concerns are mainly animal studies, human observational studies (which don’t prove cause-and-effect) and small clinical trials. And studies of dramatic shifts in eating time, as seen in people working night shifts, do not necessarily apply to people who only eat dinner a few hours past the norm.

      But putting the pieces of the puzzle together does suggest that it may be worth exploring options for readjusting habits.

      This booming field of research in meal timing involves “circadian misalignment,” when biological clocks in the body do not match up with each other. Our internal clocks produce biological rhythms driven mainly by a light-dark 24-hour cycle.

      For years, we’ve known that the brain’s biological clock affects our sleep cycles. Now scientists have discovered that organs like the liver, pancreas, body fat, muscle, and digestive tract all have their own independent biological clocks. Read more… “HealthTalk: Is eating a late dinner hurting my health?”

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