Like Many, Black and White Breast Cancer Survivors May Need to Exercise More

Like most American women (and men), most breast cancer survivors may also not be exercising enough to reap its many health benefits, suggests a new study. Yet it’s African American survivors who are even less likely to meet the activity recommendations compared to white women.Young Woman In White Sneakers Walking Outdoors

The study was published today in Cancer. It’s important because a lot of research has linked regular physical activity among survivors to to better health and longer lives.

AICR recommends that survivors follow the same activity recommendations as for prevention. Here’s a few examples of studies that have found how activity benefits survivors.

In this study, about 1,700 women diagnosed with breast cancer reported their activity habits both before their diagnosis and six months afterwards. The women ranged in age from 20 to 74, and about half were African American. Researchers converted the women’s activity habits into a common unit of measure: metabolic equivalent hours (METs).

Six months after diagnosis, 59 percent of all the patients reported being less active. Only about one-third of women reported they were active at least 150 minutes per week compared to 60 percent before diagnosis. Continue reading


Study: Major Rise in Global Obesity, Bad News for Cancer Prevention

A major global report was released today on obesity and the news is grim. The numbers of overweight and obese people around the world have increased dramatically since 1980, in both developing and developed countries and among all age groups, with the United States accounting for 13 percent of the world’s obesity.obesity-and-cancer

The report was published today in The Lancet.

The findings bode ill for cancer prevention: aside from smoking, obesity is the single largest risk factor for cancer. AICR estimates that obesity is a cause of eight cancers, including postmenopausal breast, colorectal and ovarian. Obesity also plays a major role in other chronic disease, such as type 2 diabetes, which also links to increased cancer risk.

The study included data from over 180 countries. Study researchers systematically identified surveys, reports, and studies that provided Body Mass Index data. A BMI of 25 and over is categorized as overweight; 30 and over is obese.

The Lancet report estimates that worldwide, the proportion of adults with a BMI of 25 or greater increased between 1980 and 2013 from 29 percent to 37 percent in men, and from 30 percent to 38 percent in women. Continue reading


By 2030, Top Cancer Death Causes Shift, Many Preventable

A study making news this week suggests that the leading types of cancers diagnosed and causes of death will shuffle in the coming years — with pancreatic cancer climbing to the second leading cause of death. Yet even as the top cancers shift by 2030, the research underscores the importance of preventive strategies, many of which will reduce risk for other chronic diseases.apple, tape measure, scale, stethoscope

AICR research suggests that for the 12 most common US cancers, about one third are preventable by changes to our diet, weight, and activity. Not smoking and other preventive strategies will prevent even more.

For the new study, published in Cancer Research, researchers projected cancer incidence and deaths for 2020 and 2030.

Study authors projected incidence forĀ  the 12 most common cancers for men and 13 for women. For cancer mortality they looked at the 14 deadliest cancers for men and 16 for women. They took into account changing demographics, incidence and death rates. Continue reading