Flavonoids in Your Foods, Here’s Where to Get Them

Every time you eat chocolate covered berries or drink a cup of tea, you are getting a dose of flavonoids! Flavonoids are compounds found in plant foods that are well studied for their role in preventing cancers, as well as other chronic diseases.

A new study on flavonoids is highlighted in Cancer Research Update. This study of Australian women looked at the role of flavonoids in preventing death from all causes, including cancer and heart disease specifically. Researchers found that women with the highest intake of flavonoids experienced 62% fewer deaths during the course of the 5 year study compared to those who consumed the least, with similar lower risk from cancer and hear disease.

Flavonoids are generally divided into 6 groups. Foods provide different flavonoids and so may have different health benefits.

Flavonoids

Source: USDA Database for Flavonoid Content of Selected Foods

The women in this study consumed most (about 80%) of their flavonoids from black tea, which contains flavanols. The women were not, however, eating many foods like Continue reading


Talk to Your Teens About Cancer Prevention

Parents are teens’ top source of health information, according to a new study from Northwestern University. This is important for helping your teens learn about a topic they are probably not thinking a lot about: cancer prevention.

The “Teens, Health & Technology” survey included a nationally representative group of American teenagers between the ages of 13 and 18. Fifty-five percent of teens reported that they got “a lot” of their health information from parents, followed by health classes at school, medical providers, and the Internet (see below). This means that, for the majority of teens, the conversation about cancer prevention has to begin at home.

Chart_Teens

*13-18 year olds who say they get “a lot” – Source: Teens, Health and Technology survey, June 2015.

The habits your teens are forming now will likely follow them into adulthood, so now is the time to start building positive health-promoting habits.

Here are 4 things parents can do to teach teens about cancer prevention: Continue reading


Study: To Eat Less, Choose the Right Dining Companion

If you go out to lunch with a skimpy eater, you’ll probably eat a small amount too – even if you are used to eating more, says a new study.

In this study, the authors analyzed 38 studies that looked at how much – or how little – diners’ eating habits affected their dining companions’ portions.

Studies like this can help increase our understanding of the many factors that influence how much people eat and can help you develop effective strategies to achieve a healthy weight. That’s important for cancer prevention because overweight and obesity increases risk for 10 cancers, including colorectal, postmenopausal breast and liver. Continue reading