Coffee One Way to Cut Endometrial Cancer Risk

Coffee lovers are likely enjoying a new study finding that coffee lowers risk for endometrial cancer, with the drink being almost the lone dietary factor linked to risk. The study was a large one and it’s coffee findings are similar to those of AICR’s report released last year.22007913_s

That’s certainly good news for coffee lovers, but whether you do or don’t enjoy coffee, the beverage is only one of several ways you can protect yourself against endometrial cancer.

The study, published in this month’s Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, looked at 84 foods and/or nutrients related to endometrial cancer risk. Study researchers first investigated the link among about 300,000 women participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Women had filled out questionnaires about what they ate and other lifestyle habits, and then they were tracked for endometrial diagnosis or death. This led to 10 factors linked to either increased or decreased risk, including coffee, total fat, butter, and cheese.

Then the researchers looked at how these factors linked to 155,000 women who were in two US studies, the Nurses’ Health Studies I and II. These women had also had answered questions about diet and other factors. Continue reading


New grants, new research – thanks

January is an exciting time around the AICR offices. This is when our newly-funded investigators begin work on their projects, and it’s a reminder to us that scientific research provides the basis for all of AICR’s work. Our grant program is extremely competitive and only the most novel and promising projects make it through our rigorous peer-review 2015-research-collage-smallprocess. This year’s funded research grants cover a wide variety of topics but they all focus on how nutrition, physical activity, or obesity is related to cancer, and they are all aimed at preventing cancer and improving survival.

Some of our new investigators work in labs with cell cultures or with animal models, while others work in clinics or on large population studies. You can read about their research in Cancer Research Update.

To learn more about eligibility and criteria for AICR grants, see our Grant Application Package. And if you are a researcher with a great idea for a project, keep an eye out for AICR’s call for applications in the fall. Questions? Contact us at research@aicr.org.

Thank you to AICR’s generous donors for continuing to support these innovative and important projects.

Susan Higginbotham, PhD, RD, is AICR’s Vice President of Research.


Study: Whole Grains Affect Gut Bacteria, Insulin, and Cholesterol

AICR recommends choosing whole grains over refined or processed grains— in addition to being higher in nutrients and phytochemicals, whole grains contain more fiber than refined grains. Foods containing fiber protect against colorectal cancer and may keep you full longer, helping you manage your weight. Whole grains are also linked to a lower risbowl full of oats - healthy eating - food and drinkk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Scientists are not sure why whole grains and fiber are beneficial for health, but a new study in mice published in the Journal of Nutrition adds to the evidence that changes in the types of bacteria that live in the intestines—known as the gut microbiota—may be important.

The researchers fed one group of mice flour made from whole grain oats, while the other group of mice got refined flour lower in soluble fiber. Soluble fiber slows the passage of food through the digestive tract, which may help keep you feeling full longer. It is also linked to lower cholesterol and increased insulin sensitivity, important factors in the development of heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Both diets had the same amount of protein, carbohydrate, fat, and insoluble fiber. Continue reading