Talking about Diet, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Survivors

There are now over 3 million US breast cancer survivors, with the number of survivors only expected to increase in the years ahead. Today, a new report identified potential links oxn how diet, activity, and weight may affect survival for women diagnosed with breast cancer. McTiernan, Anne

Diet, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Survivors is part of an ongoing, systematic review called the Continuous Update Project (CUP). It’s the most rigorous analysis of the research on diet, weight and physical activity for breast cancer survivors, and it’s the first time a CUP report has focused on survivorship.

Here, Anne McTiernan, MD, PhD, the panel lead of this CUP report and researcher at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, talks about the report’s findings and what it means.

Q: What did the CUP report look at?

A: The report looked at associations between specific diet patterns and components, weight, and physical activity with mortality from all causes, mortality from breast cancer, and incidence of secondary breast cancer. This report did not look at associations of diet, physical activity, or weight with quality of life, fatigue and many other issues in which lifestyle factors may play a role. Continue reading


Research Preview: Life After Childhood Cancer and The Goldilocks Effect

It’s our favorite time of year. All of us at AICR are eagerly gearing up for our annual research conference on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer here in Washington, DC, from October 29-31.

We spend the months in the run-up to the research conference looking forward to welcoming hundreds of investigators, clinicians, nurses, registered dietitians, policy makers and members of the media wGenetically Modified foodho are passionately interested in how nutrition, physical activity and obesity intersect with cancer risk.

Selecting which subjects will make for engaging and enlightening conference sessions is a job our Conference Program Committee takes seriously, and for good reason: the AICR conference’s focus on the nutrition and cancer connection is unique and specific, and it continues to sets us apart.

Our Program Committee is keenly aware that making a topic the subject of an AICR conference session does far more than simply gather scientists in a room to discuss the latest findings. It also serves to raise the visibility of a research topic before a global audience of scientists, health professionals, shapers of health policy, and the press. In a very real sense it can help drive the research agenda for the field. Continue reading


Increasing Waistlines and Cancer Risk

Americans’ waistlines are widening, finds a new study, even as our weight appears to be holding steady. The findings are important for cancer risk — along with other diseases — because while obesity is a clear cause of cancers, abdominal obesity may also independently increase risk.canstockphoto17693287

The study, published in JAMA, found that Americans’ average waist circumference increased progressively slightly more than an inch from 1999 to 2012. During those years, waists bumped up from 37.6 to 38.8 inches.

Prevalence also increased, with over half of Americans now having abdominal obesity. Prevalence rose from 46 percent in 1999 to 54 percent in 2012, among both men and women.

The study included 32,816 participants who were part of multiple national surveys from 1999-2000 to 2011-2012. Previous analyses of data from the same surveys show that obesity did not change much from 2003 to 2012, the authors write. Continue reading