Study: Vitamin E from Food, Not Supplements, May Lower Women’s Lung Cancer Risk

Although not smoking is by far the best way to reduce your risk of lung cancer, about 1 in 5 women who get lung cancer are nonsmokers according to the National Cancer Institute.

Little is currently known about the role of nutrition in preventing lung cancer in female Vit E & Supplementsnonsmokers, but research recently published in the International Journal of Cancer suggests that getting enough vitamin E from foods may lower risk for nonsmoking women, especially those exposed to secondhand smoke. However, vitamin E supplements may increase lung cancer risk in these groups.

This study’s authors used data from 65,000 Chinese women who had never smoked and followed them for an average of 12 years to see if they developed lung cancer. They found that women who consumed enough vitamin E from foods to meet Chinese guidelines at the start of the study had a lower risk of developing lung cancer compared to women who did not consume enough vitamin E. Continue reading


The Cancer Prevention Deal: Nurturing Nature

Your genes are not your medical destiny.

Dr. David Katz

With relatively uncommon exception, that is the rule established by ground-breaking research published over recent years, and nicely illustrated by a 2008 paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That rule could, and perhaps should, remake the way you play the game of life.

The illustrative trial was a pilot study of 30 men with early stage prostate cancer who were eligible to be observed carefully for disease progression without undergoing surgery, radiation or chemotherapy. These men were enrolled into a trial called GEMINAL, developed and implemented by my friend, Dr. Dean Ornish, and his colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco.

The study took advantage of often indolent prostate cancer to assess the effects of a lifestyle intervention, without the confounding influences of medical or surgical cancer treatments. The men participating in the GEMINAL study received a lifestyle intervention: low-fat, whole foods, plant-based nutrition; stress management techniques; moderate exercise; and participation in a psychosocial support group. The study lasted three months. Continue reading


When You Lose Weight, Where Does it Go?

If you’re carrying a few extra pounds, you probably know that losing weight will lower your risk of cancer and other chronic diseases. When you lose weight, yfat-cellsour fat doesn’t just disappear. But do you know where it goes?

If you’re stumped, don’t feel bad—the authors of a recently published paper asked 150 family doctors, dietitians, and personal trainers the same question and found that most of them got the answer wrong.

The most common answer given was that fat is converted to energy, but the authors point out that this violates the law of conservation of mass, one of the fundamental laws of chemistry.  Other misconceptions were that fat is converted to muscle or broken down and excreted in the feces. Continue reading