Is eating organic food better for reducing my cancer risk?

Is eating organic food better for reducing my cancer risk?

It’s one of the most asked questions we get – especially now, with a new review of the research suggesting that organics contain more antioxidants than conventional foods.canstockphoto20873615

With all the research on fruits, vegetables and other plant foods and cancer, AICR hasn’t had a lot to say about organics. There has been relatively little research on organics and cancer risk, with no clear conclusions except one: eating a diet that is mainly from plants – whether they are organic or conventional – reduces the risk of cancer.

The new analysis, published in the British Journal of Nutrition, included 343 studies from 1992 to 2012. (1992 was when the European Union started regulating organic farming; about 70% of the studies were from Europe.)

The authors looked at how organics and conventional plant foods compared in vitamins, minerals and groups of phytochemicals that have shown antioxidant — and cancer-protective — activity in lab studies. The researchers also compared levels of pesticide compounds.

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Survey: Diners – Especially Women – Using Posted Menu Calories

If you spot calorie information on your restaurant menu, does it help you decide what to order?http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-image-woman-ordering-food-image21147851

For about six of every ten adults living in select states, that calorie information does help them decide what to order. At least sometimes, that is, with about one of every ten diners using that nutrition information for every purchase, according to a new government survey.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study comes from residents of 17 states that have menu labeling and completed a 2012 phone survey about it. In 2010, a federal law required chain restaurants to display the calories of their menu items, and some states started those requirements quickly.  Given that some studies show Americans eat up to a quarter of our calories at restaurants, using calorie information may help restaurant-goers make healthier choices. That, in turn, can reduce cancer risk.

Respondents were only counted if they visited fast food or chain restaurants and noticed the menu labeling. Among the findings: Continue reading


Report: Teens Getting too Much Screen Time

About three of every four adolescents are in front of the TV and the computer beyond what is recommended, with youths who are overweight in front of screens more than their healthy weight peers, according to a new government report.

The National Center for Health Statistics report focused on how much screen time 12 to 15 year olds were getting outside of school, citing high screen times’ link with high blood pressure, cholesterol, and being overweight.

For cancer prevention, AICR recommends limiting sedentary activities. Long amounts of time sitting – such as watching TV – links to overweight and obesity, a cause of eight types of cancers. We wrote about the latest research linking inactivity and cancer risk last month.

ScreenTime

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