Alarming increases of colorectal cancer rates among young adults

Colorectal cancer is one of the most preventable cancers, yet it remains the third most common cancer among US men and women.

The good news is that rates have declined 30 percent among people 50 years of age and older, however incidence and mortality among individuals under 50 are on the rise and expected to climb. Among 20-34 year olds, rates of colorectal cancer have increased 51% since 1994 and in the period from 2010-2030, colorectal cancer in this age group is expected to increase by 90 percent.

At the Early Age Colorectal Cancer Onset Summit last week, I was one of the speakers talking about the concerning increase in this cancer among adults in their 20s through 40s.


Among 20-34 year olds, rates of colorectal cancer have increased 51% since 1994 – and in the period from 2010-2030, colorectal cancer in this age group is expected to increase by 90%.


Alarmingly, cancers in the under 50 population are diagnosed at later stages (most often due to delays in diagnosis) and appear to be more aggressive tumor types, both of which have implications for prognosis and survival.

What’s unknown is the cause of young onset colorectal cancer.

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New Study: Glycemic Index and Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the US and smoking is by far the largest risk factor – linked to about 90% of these cancers, according to the CDC. Among other lifestyle factors, researchers are looking at how diet may play a role and this week, a new study found an association between glycemic index and lung cancer.

Glycemic index (GI) is a measure of how much a food with carbohydrates increases your blood sugar. Foods like sugary beverages and cereals made with refined grains are examples of foods high in GI. Previous studies have found associations of GI with other cancers, including colorectal and stomach cancers. AICR’s CUP report on endometrial cancer in 2013 found that that a high glycemic load (related to GI) diet increases risk for this cancer. Continue reading

Can a messy kitchen lead to more sweet snacking?

How messy is your kitchen? A new study suggests that chaotic environments, such as a messy kitchen, and our mind-set in that environment may affect our ability to make healthy choices when it comes to snacking.

Choosing healthy meals and snacks can help to maintain a healthy weight and decrease cancer risk. This means that by decreasing chaos and feeling more in control, you may make it easier to eat healthy for cancer prevention.

The study is published in the Environment and Behavior journal.

messy and clean kitchen

Can a messy kitchen lead to eating more sweets?

Female college undergraduate students were put into either a standard kitchen or a messy chaotic kitchen. The standard kitchen was organized and quiet with no disruptions. In contrast the chaotic kitchen was messy with tables out of place and pots and pans scattered around. During the experiment, the chaotic kitchen participants were interrupted by researchers moving tables and banging put and pans as they cleaned up the mess.

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