Not Your Mother’s Chocolate Mousse

chocolate-and-blueberry-tofuThis Valentine’s Day, say “I love you” with a Health-e-Recipe for Chocolate and Blueberry Tofu Mousse with Sesame Crunch. This elegant dessert uses a secret, undetectable ingredient—silken tofu—to boost its health-protective phytochemicals. Adding still more cancer-fighting power, blueberry syrup lends a tangy taste contrast.

This mousse recipe was developed by Shameer Griffin of Philadelphia, PA, who won second place in the Healthy Dessert Contest hosted by AICR and the Careers Through Culinary Arts Program (CCAP), which helps high school students who aspire to be chefs.

The finished dessert looks 5-star-restaurant quality, but making it is actually simple. The mousse of almond milk, chocolate, vanilla extract and tofu takes 10 minutes or less to blend; then just chill for an hour. The blueberry syrup and sesame crunch each take about 20 minutes, but you can make them while the mousse chills. Continue reading

Adding a Spicy Zing to Sweet Apple Cider

ginger-turmeric-ciderFor cold weather, a hot drink like our Ginger and Turmeric Hot Cider warms you up fast. Its combination of ginger and turmeric add cancer-preventive compounds to the cider’s phytochemicals for a naturally sweet drink that is at once spicy and soothing.

Turmeric is the spice that gives curry powder its yellow color. By itself, dried ground turmeric doesn’t taste very strong and has a slightly peppery, earthy quality. But its health-protective qualities that are similar to ginger’s. Both are roots that contain compounds found in research studies to have antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties that protect cells against damage linked to cancer.

The color of turmeric comes from the phytochemical curcumin. The spice was used as a yellowing dye since 600 BCE, according to archeological finds in Assyria. It was less expensive than saffron, and has traditionally been used in India to color the rice served at weddings, a cosmetic, a skin tonic and as a folk remedy for stomach and liver ailments.

If you can find fresh turmeric root at an Asian or health food market, try it in this recipe; if not, just use ¼ teaspoon of dried turmeric for each serving of cider. A dash of ground turmeric can also be added to brown rice while it cooks to make the color more appealing, as well as stirred into lentil, green pea or tomato soup to enhance flavor. Hummus dip, salad dressing and stir-fries are other tasty places for turmeric.

Ginger gives a spicy zing to winter dishes. It not only adds a kick to cider, but minced fresh ginger is a key ingredient for Asian-style stir-fries and garlic sauces and tastes great in baked fruit recipes like apple crisp or fruit compote. Most grocery stores carry fresh ginger root – a little bit gives you a lot of flavor, much more than dried ground ginger.

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Superbowl Chicken Wings, A Healthy Makeover

It’s that time of the year again… we’re just days away from the big game! I love the excitement, rivalry and game-day food that comes with Super Bowl Sunday. Some of the most popular edibles are chicken wings, pizza, chips and dips. While they may be tasty, these foods are also loaded with saturated fat and salt while lacking in nutrition. 26373410_s

If you’re hosting this year, try making something new that is just as delicious and cancer-protective: chicken skewers with a zesty peanut dipping sauce. This recipe is a definite crowd pleaser – something that can help ease the competition-driven tension.

Using all white-meat chicken tenders on a grill keeps the fat content low and the portion size right. By marinating the chicken ahead of time, you will infuse flavor into the meat while also reducing the formation of cancer-causing substances caused by grilling.

Chicken Skewers Continue reading