I Saw It on TV… Weight-Loss Myths Women Hear

With AICR’s new report showing for the first time that obesity is linked to ovarian cancer, there are now even more reasons for women to maintain a healthy body weight. I’ve already written about challenges women face when it comes to weight loss, and a recent blog by Colby describes some of the many nutrition myths surrounding cancer risk.iStock_000004672120Small

To help women reduce their risk of ovarian cancer, getting to a healthy weight matters. Let’s look at a few of the many weight loss myths I hear daily from women:

1.    “I heard on Dr. Oz…” This is the start of many conversations I have with patients. It is usually followed by some supplement (e.g. garcinia cambogia) that “leads to weight loss.” There are usually few studies supporting the weight loss benefits of these supplements, potential risks or side effects from taking the supplement, and there is ALWAYS the caveat that a healthy diet and physical activity are needed for it to work. Continue reading


Tell Us Your Favorite Cancer-Protective Recipes: Vote!

Beginning today, we’re kicking off a month-long celebration of our recipes with Recipe March Madness brackets, as we’re preparing for our 500th issue of Health-e-Recipe.Spices and old recipe book on wooden background.

We asked colleagues, friends and dietitians for their favorites and narrowed the field to the 16 most popular recipes. You’ll find  four categories – Appetizers, Side Dishes, Entrees and Desserts. Vote for your favorite here in each category and then come back to vote again every week. The winner will headline on April 15.

AICR has created and shared recipes – from our 1980s paper newsletter to our emailed version today – because we know that what you eat plays a pivotal role in lowering your cancer risk.

Today you can easily find recipes online – from websites, twitter, pinterest and facebook. But it isn’t easy to find tested and tasted recipes that combine health and cancer prevention with flavor. Continue reading


Chicken Wears Green for St. Patty’s

chicken-and-cabbage cropped3 This week our new report on ovarian cancer means that there are now eight cancers linked to obesity. Our Health-e-Recipe for Chicken Baked with Cabbage and Leek is a delicious way to prepare a satisfying low-calorie meal that also fits St. Patrick’s Day.

Cruciferous vegetables like cabbage and broccoli contain potent cancer-fighting phytochemicals.Savoy and Napa varieties of cabbage have crinkly leaves and are more tender to chew than regular green cabbage. Yet they still pack healthy sulforaphane (an isothiocyanate compound), indoles and flavonoids – compounds that may protect against cancer. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family, too.

Leeks are a kind of onion and contribute protective allium compounds to this dish. With thyme and Spanish paprika, all of these ingredients blend deliciously with chicken while fortifying your health. Serve over brown rice with a wedge of fresh lemon, if desired.

For more excellent cancer-preventive recipes, visit the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.