A Fresh Veggie Quinoa

quinoa-and-broccoli croppedFirm, tender cauliflower and broccoli florets pair beautifully with quinoa in our Health-e-Recipe for Quinoa with Cauliflower and Broccoli.

Both of these cruciferous family vegetables are well known for their cancer-fighting compounds, especially isothiocyanates and indoles. And broccoli and cauliflower are even more protective in this dish, which also uses bell peppers, onion, garlic and oregano. That’s because each ingredient offers its own set of cancer-preventive phytochemicals, which reinforce the others. Eating a wide variety of vegetables improves the odds of reaping their health benefits.

Quinoa is a whole grain that may rank highest in protein content, providing 8 grams per cup. Along with the vegetables, it also contains cancer-fighting fiber. To add protein but keep it light, serve this dish with some diced chicken breast or baked fish.

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Making Your Lentils Savory in Indian Dal

indian-dalLentils and dry beans are rich in fiber that helps to prevent colorectal cancer. Our Health-e-Recipe for Indian Dal with Yogurt and Cucumbers makes lentils into a savory treat.

Onions, ginger, garlic, cumin and Indian spice mix (“masala”) give these lentils more of the protective phytochemicals found in al plant foods, plus a spicy fragrance that stimulates the appetite. Lentils also contain protein, and dal is a dish eaten daily in India.

Although red lentils are called for in this recipe, you can opt for green lentils instead. Lentils don’t need soaking and can be cooked either to a liquid consistency of soup or simmered longer until they become thick enough to eat as a dip with whole-wheat pita bread. Creamy, cool yogurt and chopped cucumber balance the spices in the lentils. It only takes 30 minutes to prepare this tasty, nutritious dish.

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Scotch Bonnet Peppers in a Tropical Slaw

caribbean-cabbage croppedTake a virtual trip to the Caribbean when you make our islands-inspired Health-e-Recipe for Caribbean Cabbage.

Scotch bonnet peppers are a popular ingredient in Jamaican cooking, where they spice up even cold dishes like this one. They contain capsaicin, a phytochemical that may ward off inflammation.

This dish teems with cancer-preventive compounds thanks to the cabbage, which contains some of the same protective substances as its cruciferous relatives broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Onion, scallion and garlic contribute healthy sulphur compounds while carrots and tomato add the carotenoid phytochemicals beta-carotene and lycopene. Fresh thyme provides the finishing touch.

So imagine you’re sitting on a beautiful beach with the aquamarine sea rolling in as you enjoy this healthy slaw. Find more delicious cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.