Promoting Health Foods in Baltimore Corner Stores

Apples, bananas, granola bars, and 100% whole wheat bread; these were just a few of the healthy food items we promoted in corner stores in Baltimore, Maryland, as part of the B’more Healthy: Retail Rewards program (BHRR) – a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg bigstock-Buildings-and-Mall-in-a-city--25171826(3)School of Public Health intervention project led by Dr. Joel Gittelsohn aimed at improving access and consumption of healthy foods for African American adults living in low-income areas of Baltimore.

Today’s Cancer Research Update has a piece on Dr. Gittelsohn’s work.

Approximately 68% of adults in Baltimore are either overweight or obese, which is higher than the percentage of overweight and obese adults nationally. Being overweight or obese increases the risk of diet-related chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer. In Baltimore, these diseases disproportionately affect low-income African Americans who tend to have diets low in fruits and vegetables and high in energy-dense processed fast food and sugary beverages. Continue reading


For Cancer Researchers, A Social Media Wake-Up Call

This year, AICR is trying something different at our Annual Research Conference on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer next week. Something we hope will act as a clarion call for cancer researcher and health professionals.canstockphoto6433880

We’ve all gone to conferences where the social media engagement is limited to attendees being encouraged to tweet their experiences. But at a breakfast session first thing in the morning on November 8th, AICR is hosting a special panel to discuss how scientists can engage in meaningful conversations with the public using social media.

There is an urgent need for responsible, evidence-based cancer information in social media, and unfortunately this need, in many cases, is now being met by self-appointed health “gurus” who make unverifiable or patently false claims. Now is the time for informed, rational voices to enter the furious ongoing discussion. We must provide context and sober, well-informed resources and information.

Social media gives scientists and practitioners with a means of sharing their work and engaging in a meaningful two-way discussion with a wider audience. Continue reading


Progress in Prevention: The Affordable Care Act

Leave the politics aside, if you can. All of us who work to fight cancer and other chronic diseases can agree on one thing: We need to do more than treat the problem. We need an increased national focus on preventiohttp://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-nutritionist-holding-green-apple-weight-scale-image28463742n.

The Affordable Care Act that goes into action tomorrow, October 1, marks significant progress on that score. Its increased focus on obesity is an acknowledgement that obesity causes major health issues. AICR research shows that obesity increases the risk for seven different cancers.

For the first time, you can receive obesity screening and counseling at no charge. This handy USA Today article reviews some of the ways that different plans will address obesity counseling and related efforts. Continue reading