Wellness Doesn’t Have to Stop When the Workday Starts

June marks the start of National Employee Wellness Month, a time to highlight how fostering and maintaining a culture of wellness in the workplace is more important than ever. With so many Americans affected by obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancer and other health conditions, many people are looking for ways to be healthier in every aspect of their lives. Lowsection of two businesspeople walking up stairs with bags in

According to a study conducted at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, the average full-time American employee works approximately 1,700 hours per year, accounting for nearly 20 percent of their time. The Cleveland Clinic notes that we sit far too much and that prolonged sitting puts individuals at risk for heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Knowing this, where better than work to start taking steps to be more active and improve your health?

That’s why the Strategies to Overcome and Prevent (STOP) Obesity Alliance is again hosting National Employee Wellness Month (NEWM), along with Virgin Pulse, Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease and WorldatWork. We are thrilled that AICR has signed on as a proud supporter. Now in its sixth year, NEWM seeks to motivate both employers and employees to focus on health and develop healthy behaviors that they can stick with, not only for one month, but throughout the year. Continue reading


Study: Major Rise in Global Obesity, Bad News for Cancer Prevention

A major global report was released today on obesity and the news is grim. The numbers of overweight and obese people around the world have increased dramatically since 1980, in both developing and developed countries and among all age groups, with the United States accounting for 13 percent of the world’s obesity.obesity-and-cancer

The report was published today in The Lancet.

The findings bode ill for cancer prevention: aside from smoking, obesity is the single largest risk factor for cancer. AICR estimates that obesity is a cause of eight cancers, including postmenopausal breast, colorectal and ovarian. Obesity also plays a major role in other chronic disease, such as type 2 diabetes, which also links to increased cancer risk.

The study included data from over 180 countries. Study researchers systematically identified surveys, reports, and studies that provided Body Mass Index data. A BMI of 25 and over is categorized as overweight; 30 and over is obese.

The Lancet report estimates that worldwide, the proportion of adults with a BMI of 25 or greater increased between 1980 and 2013 from 29 percent to 37 percent in men, and from 30 percent to 38 percent in women. Continue reading


Your County’s Health and Cancer Risk

The latest report on county health rankings found, once again, where you live makes a  difference to how long you live and your health. The least healthy counties have twice the death rates as the nation’s healthiest, according to the report. Wepeople_03

This is the fifth annual County Health Rankings, a report that compiles data on mortality and 29 health factors, including many that relate to cancer risk. For these factors, the findings are slightly encouraging for the nation. These include:

  • Obesity: Obesity rates for adults are holding steady with a rate of 28 percent for 2012. Prior, obesity rates increased from 16 percent of adults in 1995 to 28 percent in 2010. Aside from smoking, obesity is now the single largest risk factor for cancer. The latest research shows that obesity is a cause of 8 cancers, including post-menopausal breast, ovarian and endometrial. Continue reading