Exercising Daily 15 Minutes and More, Reduces Liver and Belly Fat

We’ve been talking a lot about preventing liver cancer here with the release of our new report. Among other factors, the report concluded that obesity increases risk of liver cancer —  a cancer that can stem from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

bigstock-overweight-woman-riding-bicycl-21670745Now comes a study that suggests overweight adults who do even 15 minutes of daily exercise —regardless of intensity or weight loss— can reduce the risk of both liver fat and belly fat, compared to those who are inactive. Belly fat, also called visceral fat, is a sign of poor metabolic health and another risk factor for many cancers.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the most common cause of liver disease in the US; it can lead to cirrhosis, which could develop into cancer. People with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease have extra fat in their liver that doesn’t come from alcohol. Weight loss and exercise are the basic recommendations for obese people who have NAFLD. But what intensity exercise and how much was the focus of this study. Continue reading


Headline Headaches: Alcohol, Coffee and Liver Cancer

22007913_sLast week’s release of our latest report from the Continuous Update Project, on liver cancer, received excellent press coverage, for which we are grateful. We know how tough it can be to bottom-line the sometimes complicated findings from scientific research, and we appreciate the good work of those in the media who do so on a daily basis.

Any reporter will tell you that they write the story, but it’s their editor who writes the headlines. And today, headlines do the heavy lifting of driving web traffic and reader engagement. They are the gatekeepers who determine whether or not you click to get the full story, on skim past to the next headline. Which is why, when they’re misleading, they can do real damage.

Take this example, from a UPI story: “Coffee Erases Liver Cancer Risk Caused By Daily Alcohol Consumption.Continue reading


So You’re Thinking of a Standing Desk? Learn From Us.

varidesk image

A few AICR staff enjoying standing while working!

There’s been a buzz around the AICR office lately. Not only because we kicked off our CanPrevent campaign, but a new wave of staff has opted to install standing desks! It’s wonderful to walk past offices and see some of my colleagues standing tall and typing away or reading.

Our organization offered them to us because studies have suggested that sitting or lying down for long periods of time may play a role in increased cancer risk. Standing doesn’t replace being active, but it is one way to put AICR Recommendations into action.

Standing desks were new to everyone here, so I went around asking my coworkers about their experiences and challenges. Here’s the overview.

The biggest challenges
Two challenges people faced were getting sore feet and going back and forth between documents on their desk and computer when they were standing. Comfy shoes and adapting your desk space could help – see tips below. Continue reading