Pass the Pumpkin: Three Other Fall Healthy Favorites

Though pumpkin has begun to take over the fall scene, there are many other fruits and vegetables to enjoy this time of year – all toting cancer protective nutrients. From apples to zucchini, here are three new ways to enjoy some familiar Autumn fruits and veggies.canstockphoto20734490

Zucchini Fries: Instead of the usual roasted vegetable, give zucchini fries a try. They’re a great alternative to traditional fries and offer less calories and lots of flavor.

Making zucchini fries can be a bit of a tedious process, but the end result is well worth it.

To make “fries,” leave on the skin and cut the zucchini in half width-wise. Then cut it into quarter-inch “planks” length-wise. Dredge the fries in egg white, flour, and a mix of breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese. You can substitute breadcrumbs for Panko crumbs for extra crispiness. Bake your fries at 400 degrees until they are golden brown and crispy on the outside. Serve warm with your favorite dipping sauce or plain. Your family will definitely ask for these again.

Mashing rutabaga and turnips: Both rutabagas and turnips offer a natural sweetness and are lighter than mashed potatoes, making a perfect mashed potato substitute for something different. Continue reading


Heavenly Vegetable Soup

summer-veggie-soupIf you’re looking for a bright new way to enjoy fresh summer vegetables, try our Health-e-Recipe for Summer Veggie Soup. It’s loaded with nine tasty vegetables that bring you cancer protection and it’s ideal to celebrate National Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month.

Every vegetable contains many phytochemicals – naturally occurring substances that may protect our cells from damage from aging and toxins that, over time, can lead to cancer development. These compounds work together for health protection, so this soup is a terrific way to eat the wide variety of vegetables that AICR recommends to reduce cancer risk.

To get the most out of your garlic, mince it first and let it stand for 10 minutes so its allium compounds are fully activated. The carrots add beta-carotene to this soup, and the yellow squash and zucchini contribute fiber (found in all plant foods). The potatoes, chickpeas and corn make this soup hearty, providing other nutrients. Asparagus, tomatoes, basil and chives add even more individual phytochemicals.

Find more excellent cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Roasted Veggie Salad: Sweet!

root-veggie-salad croppedRoasting root vegetables brings out their sweetness without adding sugar. Our Health-e-Recipe for Roasted Root Vegetable Salad is an attractive holiday side dish that’s filling, low-calorie and cancer-fighting, too.

This easy recipe requires nothing more than cutting and peeling a few colorful root vegetables: sweet and white potato, carrot, onion, celery and beet. Their protective phytochemicals reinforce each other to protect you from cancer while adding beautiful hues to your plate.

While they roast, mix up our delicious Mediterranean dressing. Healthy mustard, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, mustard, parsley, cilantro and walnuts are whisked into extra virgin olive oil. A crumble of feta cheese on top of this salad provides a delicious contrasting taste.

Serve at room temperature or chilled. You can even put it on a bed of mixed leafy greens to get more fiber and phytochemicals. Add a whole grain and some lean protein for a complete meal. Find more delicious, cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.