Adding Red to Your Rice

A whole new world of whole grains is opening up to us these days, and rice alone comes in a host of varieties. You may have eaten basmati rice at an Indian restaurant, green “Bamboo” rice or even black rice that actually cooks up to be dark purple and is popular in China and Thailand.canstockphoto12136641

This week’s Health-e-Recipe is for Red Rice Dressing. The phytonutrient called anthocyanin – also present in red berries – creates its hue. Red rice is grown in countries as far-flung as France and Bhutan. (Don’t confuse it with “red yeast rice,” a supposedly medicinal substance used in traditional Chinese medicine.) Red rice contains potassium, magnesium and other minerals.

All rice provides about the same number of calories in a half-cup serving: about 200. But brown, wild and colored rices can contain more cancer-fighting fiber thanks to their whole-grain status from retaining their germ and bran, versus white rice that has had these fiber extras refined out of them. Not all exotic rice is a whole grain, either: if you’re looking for basmati or jasmine rice, for example, choose brown versions to get the most fiber.

Continue reading


The Foods that May Lower Your Inflammation, Colorectal Cancer Risk

Inflammation is big news these days in the research world, as studies increasingly point to chronic inflammation as a key role in cancers, as well as other chronic diseases. Now, the first science-based inflammation diet suggests that what you eat can increase or decrease inflammation and that, in turn, can affect your risk of colorectal cancer.

The research on the inflammation diet was presented at our conference today by Susan Steck at the University of South Carolina. We wrote about their Dietary Inflammatory Index here, as well as the new study on diet and colorectal cancer. Based on their index, here’s some anti-inflammatory foods (and pro-inflammatory) they found.

inflammation_500


Pass the Pumpkin: Three Other Fall Healthy Favorites

Though pumpkin has begun to take over the fall scene, there are many other fruits and vegetables to enjoy this time of year – all toting cancer protective nutrients. From apples to zucchini, here are three new ways to enjoy some familiar Autumn fruits and veggies.canstockphoto20734490

Zucchini Fries: Instead of the usual roasted vegetable, give zucchini fries a try. They’re a great alternative to traditional fries and offer less calories and lots of flavor.

Making zucchini fries can be a bit of a tedious process, but the end result is well worth it.

To make “fries,” leave on the skin and cut the zucchini in half width-wise. Then cut it into quarter-inch “planks” length-wise. Dredge the fries in egg white, flour, and a mix of breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese. You can substitute breadcrumbs for Panko crumbs for extra crispiness. Bake your fries at 400 degrees until they are golden brown and crispy on the outside. Serve warm with your favorite dipping sauce or plain. Your family will definitely ask for these again.

Mashing rutabaga and turnips: Both rutabagas and turnips offer a natural sweetness and are lighter than mashed potatoes, making a perfect mashed potato substitute for something different. Continue reading