2013: It’s A (Healthy) Wrap

turkey-fajita croppedWrap up some healthy turkey and colorful veggies as you usher out the 2013 holiday season. Our Health-e-Recipe for Turkey Fajitas with Baby Spinach and Red Peppers tastes like it came from a restaurant — only it’s low in calories and fat.

The secret is in the seasoning. Our marinade combines chili powder, cinnamon, cumin, garlic powder, black pepper and finely ground coffee. Like the unsweetened chocolate in Mexican mole sauce, the coffee gives an earthy, roasted taste to the turkey filling.

Like other leafy greens, baby spinach contains lutein, a plant compound that may protect cells and ward off eye disease. It’s a healthier alternative to iceberg lettuce. The red bell  pepper contrasts in taste and color, adding vitamin C and natural sweetness. Red onion gives this dish a spicy flair along with more protective phytochemicals.

Whole-wheat tortillas warmed up first add cancer-fighting fiber to this dish. Whole grains are more filling than enriched white flour and are digested more slowly so that your blood sugar is maintained at a healthy level until your next meal.

Find more delicious, cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Roasted Veggie Salad: Sweet!

root-veggie-salad croppedRoasting root vegetables brings out their sweetness without adding sugar. Our Health-e-Recipe for Roasted Root Vegetable Salad is an attractive holiday side dish that’s filling, low-calorie and cancer-fighting, too.

This easy recipe requires nothing more than cutting and peeling a few colorful root vegetables: sweet and white potato, carrot, onion, celery and beet. Their protective phytochemicals reinforce each other to protect you from cancer while adding beautiful hues to your plate.

While they roast, mix up our delicious Mediterranean dressing. Healthy mustard, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, mustard, parsley, cilantro and walnuts are whisked into extra virgin olive oil. A crumble of feta cheese on top of this salad provides a delicious contrasting taste.

Serve at room temperature or chilled. You can even put it on a bed of mixed leafy greens to get more fiber and phytochemicals. Add a whole grain and some lean protein for a complete meal. Find more delicious, cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.

 

 

 

 

 


Eggplant Parmesan Makeover

cheesy-eggplant-casserole sm photoPreventing breast cancer and its recurrence means eating a healthy diet and maintaining a healthy weight, researchers advise. But that doesn’t mean you have to live on celery. Our Health-e-Recipe for Cheesy Eggplant Casserole is a satisfying yet low-calorie version of an Italian favorite.

Eggplants and mushrooms both have a texture that is dense enough to substitute well for meat. In this dish, they are combined with scallions and onions, bell pepper, garlic and tomatoes—the healthy ingredients of many delicious Italian dishes.

All of these vegetables contain phytochemicals and the tomatoes contribute vitamin C and antioxidant lycopene. This phytochemical may protect against prostate cancer and is now being studied for possible breast cancer protection as well.

The best part, however, is that the many protective compounds we get from eating a mix of different vegetables reinforce each other’s anti-cancer benefits, according to AICR/WCRF’s report and its updates.

Cheese supplies protein and calcium in this dish. Since the vegetables have so few calories, it’s possible to use moderate amounts of low-fat versions of cottage cheese and mozzarella. Enjoy this hearty, delicious dish as part of a cancer-fighting diet during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Find more cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.