Liven Up Lentil Soup

asian-lentil-soupIf you ever wished for a more interesting lentil soup, our Health-e-Recipe for Asian Lentil Soup helps you create new depths of flavor in cancer-preventive lentils.

First you sautee fresh carrots, celery, red bell pepper, onion and Chinese cabbage (bok choy) in aromatic sesame oil. These veggies are high in cancer-preventing compounds. After mixing with the lentils and vegetable broth, you add the pungent flavors of garlic, ginger, soy sauce, hoisin sauce and red pepper flakes.

Hoisin sauce is made of soybean paste, chilies and salt and tastes sweet, salty, spicy and tangy all at the same time. It’s thick and concentrated, so you only need a little bit for a lot of flavor.

For each serving of this excellent soup, you get 10 grams of protein and plenty of fiber. Try adding about half a cup of cubed firm tofu to get 8 more grams of protein (and 80 calories) while keeping this delicious dish healthy and cancer-preventive.

Find more tasty cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


2013: It’s A (Healthy) Wrap

turkey-fajita croppedWrap up some healthy turkey and colorful veggies as you usher out the 2013 holiday season. Our Health-e-Recipe for Turkey Fajitas with Baby Spinach and Red Peppers tastes like it came from a restaurant — only it’s low in calories and fat.

The secret is in the seasoning. Our marinade combines chili powder, cinnamon, cumin, garlic powder, black pepper and finely ground coffee. Like the unsweetened chocolate in Mexican mole sauce, the coffee gives an earthy, roasted taste to the turkey filling.

Like other leafy greens, baby spinach contains lutein, a plant compound that may protect cells and ward off eye disease. It’s a healthier alternative to iceberg lettuce. The red bell  pepper contrasts in taste and color, adding vitamin C and natural sweetness. Red onion gives this dish a spicy flair along with more protective phytochemicals.

Whole-wheat tortillas warmed up first add cancer-fighting fiber to this dish. Whole grains are more filling than enriched white flour and are digested more slowly so that your blood sugar is maintained at a healthy level until your next meal.

Find more delicious, cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Roasted Veggie Salad: Sweet!

root-veggie-salad croppedRoasting root vegetables brings out their sweetness without adding sugar. Our Health-e-Recipe for Roasted Root Vegetable Salad is an attractive holiday side dish that’s filling, low-calorie and cancer-fighting, too.

This easy recipe requires nothing more than cutting and peeling a few colorful root vegetables: sweet and white potato, carrot, onion, celery and beet. Their protective phytochemicals reinforce each other to protect you from cancer while adding beautiful hues to your plate.

While they roast, mix up our delicious Mediterranean dressing. Healthy mustard, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, mustard, parsley, cilantro and walnuts are whisked into extra virgin olive oil. A crumble of feta cheese on top of this salad provides a delicious contrasting taste.

Serve at room temperature or chilled. You can even put it on a bed of mixed leafy greens to get more fiber and phytochemicals. Add a whole grain and some lean protein for a complete meal. Find more delicious, cancer-preventive recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.