The Beauty of Beets…Countdown to Vote

beet-salad croppedOnce you’ve tasted fresh beets, you’ll be enchanted by their sweet taste and beautiful color. Our Health-e-Recipe for Beet, Carrot and Apple Salad shreds them with tart Granny Smith apples, carrots and chopped walnuts into a cancer-preventive salad.

Beets contain potassium, vitamin C, folate and fiber. Their phytochemicals include betalains, a class of health-protecting compounds that may be best absorbed when uncooked. Beet greens – which can be eaten lightly steamed – provide lutein, a phytochemical that protects eyesight and is also found in spinach (a botanical relative of beets).

In the U.S., fresh beets are often roasted. Eating them raw is more unusual, yet once you have, you may prefer them to the pickled versions that are high in sodium and may be packaged with added sugar. (Our recipe also tells you how to peel them without coloring your hands red.)

This week’s recipe marks our #499th issue. You can help us pick our milestone 500th Health-e-Recipe by voting in our Championship Round. It’s Lasagna versus Brussels sprouts: Vote in Recipe 500.


A Long Winter; A Hearty Winter Salad

winter-bread-salad croppedOur Health-e-Recipe for Winter Bread Salad gives you a heartier kind of salad that’s appealing in cold weather.

Instead of buying croutons, which are usually high in calories and salt, toast some whole-wheat bread cubes. High in cancer-preventive fiber, these homemade croutons will be moistened by the vinaigrette dressing for this salad while keeping their crunch. They also contrast well with the salad’s sweet onion, garlic, tomatoes, celery and romaine lettuce.

Mixing bread chunks into salad is a tradition in Italy, where this dish is called “Panzanella.” Serve it with our Tuscan Chickpea Soup or Chicken Cacciatora from the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Valentine’s Day Starter: Blackberry Salad

greens-with-blackberry-dressing croppedIf you’re looking for a way to make your meal elegant and still cancer-preventive, blackberries are an ideal choice. Our recipe for Baby Greens with Blackberry Vinaigrette is a perfect starter for a romantic Valentine’s Day dinner.
All berries contain cancer-preventing polyphenol phytochemicals. In this recipe, blackberries’ sweet-tart taste blends well with contrasting shallots and Dijon mustard in the dressing. Our recipe also puts some whole berries into the salad for an attractive combination with the salad’s greens, goat cheese and walnuts.
Blackberries may seem expensive, but if you compare them with a bag of far less nutritious chips, you get more health benefits from berries for the same cost. They have few calories and provide fiber, vitamins and phytochemicals.
Find more delicious cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.