A Fresh Veggie Quinoa

quinoa-and-broccoli croppedFirm, tender cauliflower and broccoli florets pair beautifully with quinoa in our Health-e-Recipe for Quinoa with Cauliflower and Broccoli.

Both of these cruciferous family vegetables are well known for their cancer-fighting compounds, especially isothiocyanates and indoles. And broccoli and cauliflower are even more protective in this dish, which also uses bell peppers, onion, garlic and oregano. That’s because each ingredient offers its own set of cancer-preventive phytochemicals, which reinforce the others. Eating a wide variety of vegetables improves the odds of reaping their health benefits.

Quinoa is a whole grain that may rank highest in protein content, providing 8 grams per cup. Along with the vegetables, it also contains cancer-fighting fiber. To add protein but keep it light, serve this dish with some diced chicken breast or baked fish.

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Scotch Bonnet Peppers in a Tropical Slaw

caribbean-cabbage croppedTake a virtual trip to the Caribbean when you make our islands-inspired Health-e-Recipe for Caribbean Cabbage.

Scotch bonnet peppers are a popular ingredient in Jamaican cooking, where they spice up even cold dishes like this one. They contain capsaicin, a phytochemical that may ward off inflammation.

This dish teems with cancer-preventive compounds thanks to the cabbage, which contains some of the same protective substances as its cruciferous relatives broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Onion, scallion and garlic contribute healthy sulphur compounds while carrots and tomato add the carotenoid phytochemicals beta-carotene and lycopene. Fresh thyme provides the finishing touch.

So imagine you’re sitting on a beautiful beach with the aquamarine sea rolling in as you enjoy this healthy slaw. Find more delicious cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Chicken Wears Green for St. Patty’s

chicken-and-cabbage cropped3 This week our new report on ovarian cancer means that there are now eight cancers linked to obesity. Our Health-e-Recipe for Chicken Baked with Cabbage and Leek is a delicious way to prepare a satisfying low-calorie meal that also fits St. Patrick’s Day.

Cruciferous vegetables like cabbage and broccoli contain potent cancer-fighting phytochemicals.Savoy and Napa varieties of cabbage have crinkly leaves and are more tender to chew than regular green cabbage. Yet they still pack healthy sulforaphane (an isothiocyanate compound), indoles and flavonoids – compounds that may protect against cancer. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family, too.

Leeks are a kind of onion and contribute protective allium compounds to this dish. With thyme and Spanish paprika, all of these ingredients blend deliciously with chicken while fortifying your health. Serve over brown rice with a wedge of fresh lemon, if desired.

For more excellent cancer-preventive recipes, visit the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.