Herb Roasted Turkey Breast with Vegetables: Thanksgiving Made Simple

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A couple of years ago I wrote about making a AICR’s Thanksgiving porchetta-style turkey breast, as an alternative to cooking a full turkey. I loved the flavorful spices in this dish and the ease of making a turkey breast instead of an entire turkey; it saved time and it works well for a smaller crowd.

This year I wanted to make a more simplified twist on that same recipe and make a one-pot Thanksgiving turkey that also included vegetables. This roasted vegetable and herbed turkey dish is packed full of flavor, easy to make, and is a healthier version of your traditional Thanksgiving meal.

Read more… “Herb Roasted Turkey Breast with Vegetables: Thanksgiving Made Simple”

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    Yummy, Healthy Singapore Noodles

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    singapore-noodlesYou’ll find curries in Indian restaurants and noodles in Chinese restaurants, but you may not find curried noodles unless there’s a Malaysian place in your neighborhood. If not, we offer AICR’s healthy version of Singapore Noodles, a dish that blends Chinese, Indian and Malay influences in a cancer-fighting dish using whole-grain brown rice noodles.

    Like Singapore, an island nation that grew up as a multicultural trading post in the Southeast Asia next door to Indonesia, Singapore Noodles is a mixture of diverse ingredients. Vegetables, rice vermicelli, shrimp, egg and chicken are sautéed with curry powder. Curry itself is yet another mixture of spices ranging from ginger and turmeric to pepper and cardamom. In this recipe, we add a little more turmeric, a mild-tasting spice that is related to ginger. Both are anti-inflammatory spices that studies indicate may help to reduce cancer risk.

    The health-protecting spicy red onion, bell peppers, scallions and cabbage are commonly used in Singapore Noodles. Adding egg to stir-fries is also a feature of Malaysian and Indonesian cooking. To include the egg’s bit of saturated fat, we’ve changed the traditional bits of pork (a red meat) in this dish to chicken or turkey breast and used a few small shrimp to produce an authentic flavor. A touch of sesame oil at the end makes it perfect and still lower in fat than you’d find this dish to be in most restaurants.

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      New Report: Americans Need More Red, Orange and Green

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      AmericaVegetable basketns need to add some pizzazz to our plates, specifically more colorful vegetables – red, green and orange according to a new report by the USDA. These veggies are important for overall health and in your cancer-fighting diet. Their low calories help with weight control and potent phytochemicals like carotenoids, vitamin C and flavonoids help keep cells healthy.

      The report says we’re now eating about 1/4 cup daily per 1000 calories of these vegetables, far below the recommendation. The US Dietary Guidelines say you should eat at least double that. If you’re a woman you need at least 3/4 to 1 cup daily, men need at least 1 – 1 1/2 cups every day.

      *For a 2,000 calorie diet Source: USDA, Economic Research Service, Food Consumption and Nutrient Intakes Data Product
      *For a 2,000 calorie diet
      Source: USDA, Economic Research Service, Food Consumption and Nutrient Intakes Data Product

      Fortunately, this plate redesign doesn’t take a lot of time or money. Here are 5 ways to get your 1 cup of colored veggies: Read more… “New Report: Americans Need More Red, Orange and Green”

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