Chicken Wears Green for St. Patty’s

chicken-and-cabbage cropped3 This week our new report on ovarian cancer means that there are now eight cancers linked to obesity. Our Health-e-Recipe for Chicken Baked with Cabbage and Leek is a delicious way to prepare a satisfying low-calorie meal that also fits St. Patrick’s Day.

Cruciferous vegetables like cabbage and broccoli contain potent cancer-fighting phytochemicals.Savoy and Napa varieties of cabbage have crinkly leaves and are more tender to chew than regular green cabbage. Yet they still pack healthy sulforaphane (an isothiocyanate compound), indoles and flavonoids – compounds that may protect against cancer. Brussels sprouts are part of the cruciferous family, too.

Leeks are a kind of onion and contribute protective allium compounds to this dish. With thyme and Spanish paprika, all of these ingredients blend deliciously with chicken while fortifying your health. Serve over brown rice with a wedge of fresh lemon, if desired.

For more excellent cancer-preventive recipes, visit the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Liven Up Lentil Soup

asian-lentil-soupIf you ever wished for a more interesting lentil soup, our Health-e-Recipe for Asian Lentil Soup helps you create new depths of flavor in cancer-preventive lentils.

First you sautee fresh carrots, celery, red bell pepper, onion and Chinese cabbage (bok choy) in aromatic sesame oil. These veggies are high in cancer-preventing compounds. After mixing with the lentils and vegetable broth, you add the pungent flavors of garlic, ginger, soy sauce, hoisin sauce and red pepper flakes.

Hoisin sauce is made of soybean paste, chilies and salt and tastes sweet, salty, spicy and tangy all at the same time. It’s thick and concentrated, so you only need a little bit for a lot of flavor.

For each serving of this excellent soup, you get 10 grams of protein and plenty of fiber. Try adding about half a cup of cubed firm tofu to get 8 more grams of protein (and 80 calories) while keeping this delicious dish healthy and cancer-preventive.

Find more tasty cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


Eating Arugula, Wasabi & Chinese Cabbage with Your Broccoli

Earlier today we posted about research presented at our conference on how to boost a cancer-fighting compound from broccoli called sulforaphane. You can read about that here.

For sulforphane to form in well-cooked broccoli, University of Illinois’ Elizabeth Jeffery talked about the research on eating broccoli with raw foods containing myrosinase. So what foods should you eat with your broccoli? Dr. Jeffery gave us some options, including arugula, chinese cabbage and… drumsticks?! Slide1