New Report: Americans Need More Red, Orange and Green

AmericaVegetable basketns need to add some pizzazz to our plates, specifically more colorful vegetables – red, green and orange according to a new report by the USDA. These veggies are important for overall health and in your cancer-fighting diet. Their low calories help with weight control and potent phytochemicals like carotenoids, vitamin C and flavonoids help keep cells healthy.

The report says we’re now eating about 1/4 cup daily per 1000 calories of these vegetables, far below the recommendation. The US Dietary Guidelines say you should eat at least double that. If you’re a woman you need at least 3/4 to 1 cup daily, men need at least 1 – 1 1/2 cups every day.

*For a 2,000 calorie diet Source: USDA, Economic Research Service, Food Consumption and Nutrient Intakes Data Product

*For a 2,000 calorie diet
Source: USDA, Economic Research Service, Food Consumption and Nutrient Intakes Data Product

Fortunately, this plate redesign doesn’t take a lot of time or money. Here are 5 ways to get your 1 cup of colored veggies: Continue reading


A Tempting Cauliflower Treat

cauliflower-x2172 cropped2Crunchy, cool and cancer-preventive, our Health-e-Recipe for Cool Cauliflower Salad is low in calories and abundant with flavor.

Just because cauliflower is white and not green, like its cruciferous relative broccoli, doesn’t mean it’s lacking in powerful phytochemicals that may help ward off cancer. Along with cauliflower and broccoli, cruciferous vegetables include cabbage, Brussels sprouts, turnips, kale, collard greens, radishes, parsley and watercress.

At 50 calories a serving, this tasty salad can also be a heartily portioned snack. Vegetables are naturally low in calorie density and high in fiber and water. That means they fill you up for not too many calories, compared to equal amounts of high calorie-dense foods that have lots of fat and sugar. That’s why eating a mostly plant-based diet of minimally processed foods can help keep off extra pounds while giving you protection from plenty of cancer-fighting phytochemicals.

Find more delicious cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.


A Fresh Veggie Quinoa

quinoa-and-broccoli croppedFirm, tender cauliflower and broccoli florets pair beautifully with quinoa in our Health-e-Recipe for Quinoa with Cauliflower and Broccoli.

Both of these cruciferous family vegetables are well known for their cancer-fighting compounds, especially isothiocyanates and indoles. And broccoli and cauliflower are even more protective in this dish, which also uses bell peppers, onion, garlic and oregano. That’s because each ingredient offers its own set of cancer-preventive phytochemicals, which reinforce the others. Eating a wide variety of vegetables improves the odds of reaping their health benefits.

Quinoa is a whole grain that may rank highest in protein content, providing 8 grams per cup. Along with the vegetables, it also contains cancer-fighting fiber. To add protein but keep it light, serve this dish with some diced chicken breast or baked fish.

Find more delicious cancer-fighting recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.